GOOD

Everything You Need to Know About Cooking with Blood

The Nordic Food Lab's innovative approaches to a culinarily neglected ingredient

Back in 2008, renowned Danish chef René Redzepi and restaurateur Claus Meyer, now known to foodies as the masterminds behind the four-time world’s best restaurant Noma, opened a peculiar test kitchen in Copenhagen. The Nordic Food Lab, as they called it, was a space for chefs to experiment with the weird, new, and taboo in a way they never could in a working kitchen. Ever since, they’ve scored headlines with reports on cooking with fermented grasshoppers, pheasant essence, and even beaver anal glands. But perhaps no report they’ve issued has garnered as much attention and consternation as the one released this January by then-Food Lab intern Elisabeth Paul on how to substitute blood for eggs.

Blood-based cooking has certainly been a part of Western cuisine since the time of ancient Greece, when blood sausages were mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey. And in all likelihood, people have used animal blood for sausages, soups, pastes, or drinks since the first animal slaughter. But sometime in recent history, we forgot how to use blood. The ingredient grew so taboo that even Scottish chef Nick Nairn vomited on television at the site of a bowl of cooking blood.

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Artist Uses Gay Men’s Blood to Protest a Discriminatory FDA Policy

“Blood Mirror” was created using blood supplied by men who would much rather the FDA accept their donations, instead.

image via youtube screen capture

Since the early 80s, the Food and Drug Administration, citing fears of HIV infection, has effectively banned gay and bisexual men from donating blood. It’s a policy that has, for decades now, been blasted as being both discriminatory and unnecessary. Since 2006, even organizations like the American Red Cross, and other blood-donation service providers, have begun characterizing the policy as scientifically unnecessary and outdated. Recently, even the FDA itself has considered revising their ban to allow for donations from gays and bisexual men, providing the donor has been celibate for 12 months.

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Delivery Drones May Form a Blood Supply Network for Hospitals

Yet another application of drones that may change—and save—lives.

Image via Flickr user Banc de Sang i Teixits

Forget pizza and Amazon products—the Mayo Clinic wants to use drones to supply hospitals with precious medical supplies like blood.

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