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A Victory in Borneo: Coal Plant Plans Scrapped

A small but important fight against dirty energy is won in the tropical island paradise of Sabah.



God it feels good to be able to follow up a plea for help with a message of victory. Our friends at 350.org share the news of the cancellation of a proposed coal plant in Sabah, a Malaysian state on Borneo.

Here's the background: The state and federal governments had released plans to build a coal plant in Sabah, near a strip of pristine beach between the island's incredibly biodiverse rain forests and the Coral Triangle, one of the world's most rich marine ecosystems.

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Borneo's 30-Mile Logjam on Rajang River Exposes Government Corruption

A 30-mile logjam on a Malaysian river in Borneo hints at rampant deforestation and possible government corruption.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yWE3iE2dJ8&feature=player_embedded

On Dot Earth, Andy Revkin links to the story of a 30-mile logjam on the Rajang River, Malaysia's longest, in the wake of some heavy rains, and wonders what it reveals about the rampant deforestation on Borneo (which is partially within Malaysia's borders). He also excerpts some solid local coverage from Mike Shanahan's Under the Banyan blog, which is well worth a read. Here's a taste:

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Like many, I've been following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill as if Grand Isle were my backyard. This widespread sense of personal frustration and outrage—as if we've all been directly victimized by BP—has certainly helped turn this particular spill into the most widely-reported environmental story of a generation.

Jamie Henn of 350.org has been thinking about this as well, and in a piece for YES! Magazine asked a critical question that demands reflection: Why doesn't every environmental challenge in the world feel just as personal?

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