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Celebrate Passover With the Forbidden Designer Challah Bag of Temptation

It may be the “breadless” holiday, but you can still gaze at these faux-designer carb-themed bags.

Ain’t No Challah Back (pack) Girl – Prada, 2015
13″ × 7″ / oil paint, urethane, and hardware

Just in time for the holy holiday of forbidden carbs, why not get together with a loved one and covet a highly-attractive, highly-verboten challah bag? Canadian-American painter and sculptor Chloe Wise, known for her inventive takes on the themes of consumerism and mass production, recently created a series of “bread bags”—cheeky homages to disposable luxury and conspicuous consumption in modern society. Wise has cleverly created this faux-line of purses, totes, and backpacks to mimic actual wares by some of fashion’s biggest names, including Prada, Chanel, and Louis Vuitton. In Wise’s world, a dangling lox bagel becomes a coin purse, a PBJ sandwich is a pricey patchwork tote, and an English muffin transforms into a tasty handbag. Created from ordinary breads, the artist casts the forms in urethane before employing a hyperrealist, trompe l’oeil effect—painting the exteriors to create the illusion of fresh baked pastry. Below, check out some of our favorites from her 2015 Bread Bags collection.

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Beware of Whole Grain Inflation

Subway offers sandwiches on 9-grain bread. You can find 10-grain, 12-grain, and even 15-grain breads in supermarkets. What do all these claims mean?

Subway offers sandwiches on 9-grain bread. Krispy Kreme has multigrain donuts and Dunkin Donuts offers multigrain bagels. You can find 10-grain, 12-grain, and even 15-grain breads in supermarkets. As Rob Beschizza wrote on BoingBoing, "The shelf seems to be graining under all that whole grain goodness."

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Feast Your Eyes: The Angriest Sandwich Ever (UPDATED)

Why is this Yemeni protester wearing bread on his head?


This photo of a Egyptian Yemeni protester with bread taped to his head popped up on BoingBoing earlier today, where it has attracted a range of more or less amusing comments (sample: "When you are too poor to afford meat helmets then it really is time for revolution" and "Cat with bacon taped to it salutes this man").

But what is going on here? Perhaps it is a kind of decorative armor, with Viking-style horns and a circular badge in front, designed to inspire fear and awe in all who see it? Or is it instead a form of functional head protection? Bread certainly does have a useful shock-absorbing quality—as a former grocery bag packer, I can tell you it makes a great cushion for eggs.

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