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High Schoolers Temporarily Disqualified From Championship Basketball Game For Wearing Pink

Their pink uniforms were meant to show support for breast cancer awareness. Bad call, tourney enforcers.

A group of teenage basketball players thought they were instilling goodwill into the community when they decided to wear special pink accented uniforms in support of breast cancer awareness to a couple of their playoff games. The Narbonne High Gauchos in Harbor City, CA were instead slapped with a disqualification and bounced from the rest of post season on Monday for breaking a rule that prohibits teams from wearing any uniform colors but their official ones.

Image by Steve Snodgrass via Creative Commons

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Germany’s Blind Breast Cancer Detectors

Braille readers are able to detect tumors much earlier than most doctors and women performing self-exams.

Science shows that many good ideas occur while in the shower. One morning, Frank Hoffman, a German doctor, was struck by the thought: would blind women do his job better than him?

It’s fairly well known that blind people trained to read Braille have a highly developed sense of touch, even more so than their counterparts who do not read Braille. Hoffmann hypothesized that blind and visually-impaired women might be the best candidates to carry out breast examinations on patients, which depends on searching for small irregularities in breast tissue.

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Judge Gives Philly Area Students the Right to "Heart" Boobies

Two students who got in trouble last October for wearing the "I (heart) Boobies! (Keep A Breast)" bracelets are vindicated by a federal judge.

Thanks to a federal judge, students at Easton Area Middle School can once again express their love of boobies. Two students, 12-year-old Kayla Martinez and 13-year-old Brianna Hawk, got in trouble last October 28, Breast Cancer Awareness Day, for wearing the ubiquitous, awareness raising "I (heart) Boobies! (Keep A Breast)" bracelets. School officials banned the bracelets at the start of the school year, alleging they were a sexual double entendre and could encourage harassment. The ACLU filed suit on behalf of the girls and their parents, saying the ban infringed on their free speech rights.

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