GOOD

Viral Marketing: What’s Stopping Men From Getting the HPV Vaccine

There’s no way to tell if you, or your partner, lost the genetic lottery. So get the vaccine and tell your friends to do the same.


In early 2011, my doctor informed me that a vaccine to protect against the human papillomavirus—HPV—was now available for men. I was relieved, then frustrated—my doctor didn’t actually offer the principal vaccine, Gardasil, to her male patients. After a couple days of hunting around town, I finally found the vaccine at the Mazzoni Center, a LGBT health clinic in downtown Philly. I received all three shots, and joined the less than 1 percent of American men who are vaccinated against the most dangerous strains of the virus.

While I was exceedingly grateful to the Mazzoni Center inoculating me, I knew of only one other male friend who’d received his shots. So since I got my shots, I’ve made a point of discussing my experience with any friend, acquaintance, or bemused bystander who will listen. And I’ve learned two things about young, straight men and HPV: We all know it exists, and not much else.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The Scientific Roots of the Zombie Threat

Just for the fun of it, we take a look at what science has to say about how to induce a stupor and the effects of eating brains.

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Preparedness, the federal agency that bills itself as "your online source for credible health information" released a guide to preparing for the zombie apocalypse.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Thirsty Students: Access to Drinking Water is Lacking in Public Schools

America's kids are dehydrated and that could be affecting their academic and physical performance.


Feeling a little parched? Next time you take a trip to your office water cooler or sip from your Sigg bottle, think about all the school children who aren't able to drink water during the school day—not even during their lunch period. The result? America's kids are dehydrated, and it could be affecting their academic and physical performance.

According to the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a mere 15 percent of middle school students consume the minimum six to eight glasses of water a day. Part of the new Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 says that clean water must be easily available on campus, but that's usually limited to a few fountains for thousands of students. Some teachers discourage consumption of water and other liquids because they don't want students asking to go to the restroom during class time. Students also often skip drinking from the fountain—lines are sometimes long, it's hard to get a good drink of water when someone's behind you hissing, "Hurry up!" and the unfiltered water might taste or smell bad.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

News Flash: Biking and Walking are Really Good for You

If you didn't already know it, biking and walking are really good for you. Thanks to a new study released by the Alliance for Biking and Walking...

If you didn't already know it, biking and walking are really good for you. Thanks to a new study released by the Alliance for Biking and Walking (and funded by the CDC) we now have the data to prove it. There is a lot of great information in the study and I recommend you check it out. But for those of you on the fly, a few highlights:-Less than 10% of all trips are made by bike or foot-From 2000-2007 the number of commuters who bike to work increased by 42%-States with the highest levels of cycling and walking have the lowest levels of adults with hypertension, obesity, and diabetes-New Yorkers (not a big surprise) make more of their trips by foot or bike than any other state- almost 19% of their trips -North Dakota, South Carolina, Delaware and Mississippi tied for last place– only about 5% of trips are made by foot or bikeOne quandary (and a reason many people stay in their cars) is that study also shows cyclists and pedestrians are at a disproportionate risk of being killed. Not a big surprise when you consider that less than 2% of the federal transportation budget is allocated towards walking and biking. Savvy policy makers might consider the public health benefits (and corresponding impact on health care budgets) when divvying up the monies next time around.Photo: Flickr / stevemacdonaldThis post originally appeared on www.refresheverything.com, as part of GOOD's collaboration with the Pepsi Refresh Project, a catalyst for world-changing ideas. Find out more about the Refresh campaign, or to submit your own idea today.
Articles