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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFzUYRC3_H8

When you stroll through the streets of New York City and stumble across chess players, it's hard not to stop and admire the strategic intensity involved in moving queens and pawns across that black and white-squared chess board. It turns out that for the past 13 years, students at Intermediate School 318, a 1,600 student public middle school in Brooklyn's Willamsburg neighborhood, have been bringing that same intensity to the game, racking up more national chess championships than any other school in the nation. Now we get a taste of their success through Brooklyn Castle, a must-see documentary about a year in the life of five members of I.S. 318's chess team.

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Where Geeks Are Rock Stars: Documentary Spotlights an Urban School's Champion Chess Team

Brooklyn Castle tells the story of how chess transformed an entire school.

Where's the best junior high school chess team in the nation? It's not at a private school or in some wealthy suburb. Instead, it’s at Brooklyn's Intermediate School 318, where the majority of students are low-income children of color. A new documentary called Brooklyn Castle follows members of the school's chess team for one year to show how the program has transformed the students and the entire school.

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Checkmate! Chess Program Makes Kids Better Thinkers

Looking for an effective way of teaching kids critical thinking skills, as well as history, math, and reading? Try the world's oldest game.

\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n Looking for an inexpensive (and fun) way to teach students much needed critical thinking and analysis skills, as well as history, math, and reading? Introduce them to one of the world's oldest games: chess. First Move, a 6-year-old Seattle-based organization that has helped put chess in almost 20,000 second and third grade classrooms in 27 states, provides a two-year curriculum to make it easy for educators.

First Move's executive director, Wendi Fischer, takes on a persona called "The Chess Lady" to give students lessons in how to play the game. Students also learn the medieval origins of chess—everything from the role of the church and how bishops advised the kings and queens to how pawns represent the historical (and expendable) peasants. Actually playing the game then helps students develop the ability to focus and think ahead, and reinforces math concepts like coordinates and quadrants.

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