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Which Cities Are Most Ready for Electric Vehicles? You May Be Surprised

Dallas and Memphis are better equipped than San Francisco and Seattle, according to EV software maker Xatori.


According to Xatori, makers of electric-vehicle-related software, Dallas is the second-most EV-ready city in the United States. Now, they're using the incidence of charging stations as their metric, and as Armen Petrosian, Xatori's chief technical officer, told me, that's not necessarily a great indicator of where the actual electric vehicles are, but it is a pretty interesting statistic.

Here are the rankings, based on data stored in PlugShare, the company's EV-focused social network, public charging locations, and 2012 U.S. Census data. These are the number of public charging locations per 100,000 residents.

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Ways to Better Spend $4 Billion Per Year in Oil Subsidies

Here are three ways we could better our Big Oil subsidies. Except these ideas would actually ease pain at the pump and save Americans money.

For the last three years, President Obama has proposed eliminating $4 billion in subsidies and tax breaks to oil companies in his budget. Every year, Congress has ignored the proposal.

Last week, the idea got a bit more traction, as the big five oil companies all announced massive first quarter profits (while gasoline hovers around $4 per gallon), and even some Republican leaders are paying the idea of cutting subsidies some lip service. Of course, most members of Congress receive so much funding from the oil companies that they'll make comments like Sarah Palin's: that $4 billion is a "drop in the bucket" and not worth eliminating.

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Gas Too Expensive? The Chevy Volt Gets 1,000 Miles per Tank

With a gallon of gas hovering around $4, the plug-in hybrid almost seems like the pragmatic option.

Gas is expensive these days. The national average is roughly $4 per gallon. Depending on where you are (and how big your tank is), filling up can cost anywhere from $40 to $100 and up. A Ford Excursion has a 44-gallon tank. Filling one of those up from empty in Los Angeles right now would cost almost $200.

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GM Is Reusing Oil-Soaked Booms in the Chevy Volt

Remember those plastic booms they used to clean up oil from the Deepwater Horizon Spill? They're being turned into car parts.


Remember those plastic booms they used to clean up oil from the Deepwater Horizon Spill? General Motors has announced it will repurpose 100 miles of the boom used off the Alabama and Louisiana coasts to create "under hood parts" for the Chevy Volt.

More than 100,000 pounds of plastic resin will be created by recycling this boom, which means that there will be 100,000 fewer pounds of waste from the Gulf oil spill. The recycling process involved several steps including the removal of oil and wastewater from the collected booms, preparing the plastics for die-mold production and ultimately creating the components. GM worked with several companies during this multi-step process including Heritage Environmental, Mobile Fluid Recovery, Lucent Polymers and GDC Inc.

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Electric Cars Are Coming, But Can the Grid Even Handle Them?

What will happen when we all plug in our electric cars at the same time?n

What will happen when we all plug in our electric cars at the same time?

Have you noticed that plug-in electric vehicles are slowly trickling into the mainstream? If you haven't, you certainly will soon—major automakers like Nissan, Chevrolet, and Toyota all have plug-in electric or hybrid electric offerings set to roll off production lines in the next few years. But there's a catch: As it stands, the electrical grid can't handle the onslaught of electric vehicles that will all start charging at, say, 7 p.m. every evening when commuters get home from work. If everyone in your city or town started driving (and subsequently charging) EVs today, the grid would probably fail. So what can be done?

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Don't Kill Your Car

by Jacob Gordon illustrations by KEITH Scharwath We're sure you want to, but try one of these instead. What's best for the planet? What's best for you? The ultimate guide to alternative-fuel cars in 2009 and beyond. These are weird times in the car world. Electric cars are decidedly undead, the great..

We're sure you want to, but try one of these instead. What's best for the planet? What's best for you? The ultimate guide to alternative-fuel cars in 2009 and beyond.

These are weird times in the car world. Electric cars are decidedly undead, the great hydrogen hope seems to have come to an end (for now), and Indians are running their cars on air. Meanwhile, low-carbon technologies are growing like mushrooms after a rain, and hybrids-which have had years-long waiting lists-are ready to go mass-market. Of course, even as it grows, the industry is in ruins. And so is the planet, thanks in part to that industry.Oh, and us. Thanks to us, too. Cars don't drive themselves, and with transportation the fastest-growing producer of carbon emissions in the United States-already accounting for 30 percent of greenhouse gases-this is obviously not a problem we can buy our way out of. A new breed of cleaner vehicles is inspiring and very necessary, as are new models of car sharing, urban bike fleets, better driving habits, and mass transit. But these may be dwarfed by the sheer number of new drivers who get behind the wheel each year. China is already on the verge of passing the United States as the world's largest car market.The challenges are many, but we have a unique opportunity to chart a new path in the way we get around. The electric car is promising, but much more meaningful is an electric car that is just one component of a low-carbon economy and way of living. Then the automobile can become a tool to help us in the very necessary reinvention of the way our whole society works.So as we start that reinvention, here's a look at the ideas, technologies, and innovators paving the blacktop to the future.

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