GOOD

The Interview and 3 Other Films Too Controversial To Release

Hollywood’s is a history rife with offensive films, political controversy and reactionary self-censorship.

The world reacted with great sorrow and regret today as Sony Pictures announced it would be cancelling all screenings of The Interview, the clever, sophisticated political comedy about how James Franco and Seth Rogan attempt to assassinate North Korean president Kim Jong-un. Cinephiles are surely weeping over this great loss to the American film canon. Franco and Rogen will have to find some way to console themselves over this agonizing blow to their artistic repertoire, perhaps by rolling around in the piles and piles of money they will make from the movie anyway.

If there are worries this might have a chilling effect on future film production, they’ve been justified. It looks like another North Korean-related film project, this one starring Steve Carell, has been tabled indefinitely. Still, this isn’t the first time a film project has been shut down over concerns about its contents. Hollywood’s is a history rife with offensive films, political controversy and reactionary self-censorship. Here are three films that were too contentious to be screened:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

5 Amazing Tech Breakthroughs First Seen in Movies

Brought to you by Intel. Check out a few of the most intriguing ideas that were first seen on the big screen before they came to life.

This content was produced by GOOD with the support of Intel

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Food For Thinkers: Edible Architecture

Salmon skin walls and structural systems made from spaghetti: for architect David Garcia, food is a building material with infinite possibilities.



I have to admit, I'm pretty excited with how this week of Food For Thinkers is going. Thus far, we have rediscovered food through the eyes of a space archaeologist, a graphic designer, and a culinary librarian. I say "rediscovered," because I had not previously realized what Sputnik-shaped foods could tell us about Cold War anxiety, how terrifyingly alien supermarket shelves might appear if you grew up without exploring them, and how something as simple as the addition of a childrens' section on a restaurant menu can tell a story about a neighborhood's changing demographics.

Next up is architect David Garcia, who explains that for him, food is just another addition to his repertoire of building materials, each of which has its own formal properties and aesthetic qualities:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles