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Selfridges Will Launch a Gender-Neutral Clothing Pop-Up Shop

The U.K. retailer is going all-out with gender-neutral window displays and unisex collections.

Selfridges' interior. Photo by Flickr user Mark Hogan.

Selfridges is saying, “fuck it,” to the gender binary with a forthcoming pop-up shop of gender-neutral clothing. The Agender Project will give you access to all the pieces you need to achieve Tilda Swinton’s effortless androgynous cool (radiant personality sold separately). In a statement to the press, Selfridges described the Agender Project “a fashion exploration of the masculine, the feminine and the interplay…found in between,” and said that it will “take…customers on a journey where they can choose to shop and dress without limitations or stereotypes.”

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Transgender Clothes Swap is Killing It

A new site and app in the works to make swapping and donating easier

Image via the Trans Clothes Swap Tumblr.

Trans Clothes Swap is celebrating its one-year anniversary with plans of expansion. The Tumblr-based marketplace sprung up last year, serving people in the US, UK, Canada, South America, Europe and Australia.

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Wonder Where Your Donated Clothes End Up? Not Where You Think

Most of us have, at one point or another, donated unwanted clothes to charity, a Salvation Army, a local drop box.

Most of us have, at one point or another, donated unwanted clothes to charity, a Salvation Army, or a local drop box. The hope is that we'll help clothe needy people in our communities. But a recent report from NPR reveals that while we think we are helping locally, most of our garments are being sent elsewhere—much farther elsewhere.

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Levi Srauss & Co. is holding a design competition to reduce the carbon footprint of their jeans—on the consumer end, at least. The company hired a third party to assess their products' carbon footprints, and learned that "60 percent of the climate impact comes during the consumer phase," mostly when using conventional machine dryers after washes. Levi's Care to Air Design Challenge invites you to create a method or apparatus for drying jeans (and other clothes) that is "stylish, sustainable, and effective" and uses little or no energy.

I don't know what Levi's is actually doing to reduce the sizable production side of the environmental equation, other than that the company says it "is taking strides to bring its carbon footprint down to zero and build sustainability into everything they do." Regardless, I love the idea of promoting clothesline drying, which is a great practice and probably even makes a pair of jeans last longer. And I would love to know of new ways to use the time-honored technique in a small apartment or an area without a lot of sun.

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