GOOD

For Ramadan, Coca-Cola Eschews Labels and Asks Us to Do the Same

Soda company’s new campaign encourages us all to look past first impressions.

image via youtube screen capture

For the last several weeks, and continuing until July 17th, Muslims around the world have been celebrating the holiday of Ramadan, during which observant practitioners traditionally fast during daylight hours, eating and drinking only after dark. To mark the occasion, Coca-Cola has temporarily removed its iconic signature from pop cans sold across the Middle East, replacing its familiar calligraphic name with a simple message of open-minded tolerance.

Keep Reading
Articles

New Ad Viciously Spoofs Iconic Coke Commercial to Stress Soda Risks

Coca-Cola’s 1971 “Hilltop” ad helped redefine the soda for a new generation. Now, doctors hope their version can do the same.

image via youtube screen capture

When it first aired in 1971, Coca-Cola’s “Hilltop” ad was the most expensive commercial ever recorded, launching not only the careers of The Hillside Singers, but also a new era in advertising altogether. It has since gone down in history as one of the most effective commercials of all time, earning both industry accolades, and a coveted spot as the ultimate Don Draper creation in the final moments of TV’s Mad Men. Armed with a message of global feel-good-ness and an impossibly catchy jingle, Coke’s Hilltop commercial sold more than just bottles of pop (though it sold plenty of those)—it sold a lifestyle in which the product became synonymous with multi-cultural good vibes. And who wouldn’t want to get some of that?

Keep Reading
Articles

Regulators, Mount Up: What Happens to the Coke in Coca-Cola?

In order for Coca-Cola to continue to exist in its current form, the company has a special arrangement with the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Dan Lewis, author of the daily newsletter Now I Know (“Learn Something New Every Day, By Email”) joins us Wednesdays with surprising facts about the world of business.

Keep Reading
Articles

Spider Webs and the Battle Over Federal Caffeine Limits

One hundred years ago, the predecessor of the FDA had no data on how caffeine affects humans. Unbelievably, the same is pretty much true today.


A fascinating article in Monday's New York Times looks at the long debate over safe limits for caffeine consumption in the United States. "Long" in this instance means 100 years—journalist Murray Carpenter tells the story of the USDA vs. Coca-Cola, which went to trial a century ago this month.

At the time, Coke contained 80 milligrams of caffeine per serving, as much as a Red Bull today. To defend themselves against the government's charge that caffeine was a harmful ingredient, they hired a scientist to look at the effects of the stimulant on the mental and motor skills of both abstainers, occasional, and heavy users. No one had gathered this kind of data before.

Keep Reading
Articles