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Why We Need Coding Clubs for Girls

Girls Who Code was born out of my experience in politics.


Girls Who Code was born out of my experience in politics.

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What Does the 'Hour of Code' Really Look Like at a K-12 School?

So, what exactly do teachers do during the 'Hour of Code?' The first school in the U.S. to make coding part of the core curriculum reveals all.


"Anybody can learn to code." That’s the mantra of Code.org, and it became our school's mantra as well during the Hour of Code.

I'm a global history teacher and technology integration specialist at Beaver Country Day School, an independent school for grades 6-12 located just outside of Boston. On Monday morning we held a schoolwide "Hour of Code" as a part of Computer Science Education Week. Teachers throughout the school led students through a variety of tutorials and activities that connected their specific course content to coding. Simultaneously, teachers throughout the United States and beyond worked in a similar fashion to highlight not only the significance of coding in today's world but the practicality (and necessity) of it. As of today than 12.4 million participants have participated in an Hour of Code from December 9-15, exceeding the goal of introducing 10 million students to one hour of computer science.

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If a 90-Year-Old Can Learn to Code, What's Your Excuse?

The Hour of Code has a lofty goal: to get 10 million students to code for an hour this week.


The data says there will be 1.4 million jobs in computer science in the year 2020 but we only have 400,000 students enrolled in computer science classes. That's why on Monday every student at Los Angeles' Foshay Tech Academy—and a large percentage of all students at Foshay, a K-12 school in the Los Angeles Unified School District—completed the Hour of Code.

If you are unfamiliar with the Hour of Code check out the two-minute video below and notice that even Google (!) dedicated its doodle on Monday to the Hour of Code:

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The Next Frontier of STEM Education: Ensuring Access For Minority Students

if students who are underrepresented in STEM are nurtured, America's sure to be able to meet the demands of the 21st century workforce.


This post is brought to you by The Air Force Collaboratory

Despite the growing diversity of America's population, a recent study from the U.S. Department of Commerce (PDF) found that whites are twice as likely to have a science or engineering job as their black or Latino peers. To help eliminate this gap, some of the most innovative STEM initiatives are those geared toward increasing the number of minority students getting involved in those fields.

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The Next Frontier of STEM Education: Ensuring Access For Minority Students

if students who are underrepresented in STEM are nurtured, America's sure to be able to meet the demands of the 21st century workforce.

This post is brought to you by The Air Force Collaboratory

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Google Engineer Says Vietnamese 11th Graders Know Enough Computer Science to Pass Their Interview Process

Google Engineer Says Vietnamese 11th Graders Know Enough Computer Science to Pass Their Interview Process

With 1 million more jobs than there are computer science students anticipated by 2020, learning computer programming is as essential for the 21st century workforce as learning to read or write. But here in the United States only 10 percent of K-12 schools even offer computer science classes, which means our kids aren't being set up for success.

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