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Barbershop Pilgrimage: A Colombian Election Day Ritual

The rooster sings once, twice. A ray of light crosses the window. It's early—so early that even Niqui, the old criollo dog has acknowledged that...

The rooster sings once, twice. A ray of light crosses the window. It's early—so early that even Niqui, the old criollo dog has acknowledged that the day has begun.

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Are Students at Women's Colleges Still Second-Class Ivy Leaguers?

Many Columbia students felt spurned by Obama's choice to speak at Barnard, and their disappointment brought out uncensored venom.

Fourteen years ago, I arrived on the Barnard College campus with my Kmart steamer trunk and my outlet mall power suit—the two things my parents back in Colorado were convinced someone would need at a fancy northeastern school. Upon setting foot on campus, I promptly learned I was a stupid slut. It wasn’t because of the nerdy luggage or the discounted attire, but simply because I had chosen to attend an all-women’s college affiliated with a coed school. Who knew?

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KIPP's Graduation Rate Stats Spark Charter School Debate

Data from the charter school network shows a higher college graduation rate than for students attending regular public schools.


The debate over charter school effectiveness roars on thanks to new data from national charter network, KIPP. On Thursday they released a report showing that of the 209 students who attended the first two KIPP schools in New York and Houston 10 years ago, only 33 percent have gone on to earn a college degree. The results are way below KIPP's ambitious goal of 75 percent of students graduating from college, but the national college graduation average for students from predominantly low-income black and Latino student schools is a mere 8.3 percent. And, in the general population, only 30.6 percent of Americans between the ages of 25 to 29 have earned a college degree. By comparison, KIPP's first class has done great. But, does this mean that all charter schools—or all 99 KIPP schools nationwide—are high performing, and regular public schools should be converted to charters? Not exactly.

Every charter is different, but there are some commonalities. Many have cohesive school cultures around student achievement and work to invest and motivate the entire student body around academic goals. They also usually have much longer school days—KIPP students attend from 7:30 a.m to 5:00 p.m. and have mandatory Saturday classes. Charters often require that teachers be available to kids after hours. KIPP teachers are required to carry a cell phone, give the number to students, and be available till late in the evening for student and parent questions. And, most charter school teachers aren't unionized. Principals have the power to hire who they want instead of just being assigned a teacher by the school district, and they can fire a teacher immediately for any reason.

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