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In the U.S., the average consumer has more than enough clothes. So labels have to keep generating new styles and fashion trends to keep people consuming. If clothes didn't go out of fashion, think of how little each of us would spend on them.

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The Annual Letter from Bill and Melinda Gates is a big deal. As two of the wealthiest people on Earth, they have intentionally been transforming that massive wealth into world-changing philanthropic efforts, setting an example for the most fortunate and privileged people around the globe. It’s not about how much wealth you acquire but what you do with it.

The whole letter is worth a read.

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Photo courtesy of Remembering Holly Butcher/Facebook used with permission.

At the beginning of the year, Upworthy, our sister site, published a story about the final words of Holly Butcher, a woman who died of cancer at the young age of 27. In the days after her death, her powerful, life-affirming Facebook post had over 56,000 shares, but the word keeps spreading.

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48 Things Men Hear in a Lifetime (That Are Bad For Everyone)

Men are raised to believe that traditionally feminine qualities are “bad.”

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Last week, The Huffington Post released a two-minute video in which women of all ages and ethnicities revealed the subtle (and not so subtle) sexist overtures they hear on a regular basis. The video, entitled “48 Things That Women Hear in a Lifetime* (*That Men Just Don’t),” showed the constant barrage of sexist remarks women are forced to contend with throughout their lifetimes. To show how men also experience a similar form of sexism, The Huffington Post released a new video produced by former GOOD contributor Oliver Noble, “48 Things Men Hear in a Lifetime* (*That Are Bad for Everyone).”

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Prison inmates and jailers are known for having adversarial relationships. While the prisoner rots in a cold cell, the guard stands on the other side of the bars with the keys to his or her freedom dangling at the waist. But a recent incident at the Parker County Courthouse in Texas showed that not only can hardened criminals find a soft spot for a guard in need, they’re also willing to risk their lives for the officer.

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After the uprising in Ferguson, Missouri, and Donald Trump’s xenophobic rise to the top of the Republican presidential race, it’s obvious that the United States still has a problem with race. But is the U.S. more or less tolerant than other countries? According to a 2013 study by the World Values Survey, Americans overall are much more tolerant than the citizens of most other places in the world.

The World Value Survey is a global network of scientists and researchers based in Sweden who study changing values and their impact on social and political life. The group’s researchers asked participants in more than 80 countries what kind of person they’d want as a neighbor. Those who responded that they wouldn’t want “people of a different race” were deemed racially intolerant. The map below was created by The Washington Post to depict how 80 countries responded to the question.

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