GOOD

Oh, irony. You are having quite a day.

The Italian region of Veneto, which includes the city of Venice, is currently experiencing historic flooding. Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro has stated that the flooding is a direct result of climate change, with the tide measuring the highest level in 50 years. The city (which is actually a collection of 100 islands in a lagoon—hence its famous canal streets), is no stranger to regular flooding, but is currently on the brink of declaring a state of emergency as waters refuse to recede.

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The Planet

Getting it Right: Rebuilding Local Economies After a Natural Disaster

While New Orleans was the first American city in a century to suffer a landscape-scale disaster, it will certainly not be the last.

I’ve spent most of the past five years living in New Orleans researching the city’s recovery, and I’ve thought a great deal about what happens to economies in serious disaster situations. They seem simple, but they inevitably spawn maddening numbers of correlates.

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Articles

Interactive Chart: Deaths per TWh by Energy Source

Coal is the most lethal energy source, while natural gas and nuclear stack up relatively well.

This interactive visualization, found at the IBM research site Many Eyes, allows you to compare the number of deaths, measured per terawatt-hour (TWh), that can be attributed to each of the main sources of energy worldwide—coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, hydro, and peat or biomass—against the proportion that each contribute to global energy production.

Click on the button on the top-left of the graphic below to open it up. The left column represents the percentage of global energy production for each source. The right column reflects the deaths per TWh that are attributable to each source.

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Articles