GOOD

New App Helps Boston High Schoolers Fight for Their Student Rights

The student-built app puts the power of self-advocacy right in the palm of your hand.

image via (cc) flickr user kumonews

Boston-area high schoolers have a new digital tool to help them flex their student rights and understand their responsibilities as members of their local public school system.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

iNsane? Auburn, Maine, Is Giving an iPad2 to Every Kindergarten Student

Next school year, every five-year-old in Maine will learn via iPad. Is it too much tech too soon?

\n\n\n\n\n Maine (who would have guessed?) continues to lead the way in education technology. Not only is the state an international leader in tech literacy due to their one-to-one laptop program for middle and high school students, now one small town plans to give an iPad 2 to every kindergarten student.

The school board in Auburn, population 24,000, voted unanimously to provide the tablets to 285 kindergarteners and their teachers. At $475 a pop, the investment will cost around $200,000, but the board hopes the tablets will help boost literacy from 62 percent to 90 percent by 2013. Superintendent Tom Morrill says the investment's worth it, calling the devices "essential" and saying they're "even more important than a book." Morrill hopes to make the investment an annual one, giving iPads to every following class. His plan is to pay for the devices with private donations, but if that falls through, the bill will fall to the city's taxpayers.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

"I Was Itching Like a Crackhead": Study Finds College Students Addicted to Media

Students across the globe can't function without media for even 24 hours without experiencing addiction-like withdrawal symptoms.



What do college students in China, Chile, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Uganda have in common? According to a new global study by the University of Maryland's International Center for Media & the Public Affairs (ICMPA) and the Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change, they're all addicted to media. That might not seem like news—after all, there's a reason the term "CrackBerry" came into being—but just how severely students are addicted is startling, and has real implications for our schools where Skyping, blogging, learning-via-gaming technology is increasingly the norm.

Researchers asked 1,000 students at a dozen universities in ten countries on five continents to abstain from any kind of media consumption—no TV, no smartphone games, no Twitter or Facebook, and no instant messaging—for 24 hours, and then write about how they felt. A majority confessed that they actually couldn't complete the challenge. Even a few hours without access to media made American students feel, "like an addict," and like they were "going crazy. One even wrote, "I was itching, like a crackhead, because I could not use my phone." (CrackBerry, indeed!)

Keep Reading Show less
Articles