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2016 Presidential Hopefuls Get A Black Metal Makeover

A satanic rebranding of America’s next potential president.

Lincoln Chafee has never looked cooler.


Sure, Shephard Fairey’s 2008 Obama “Hope” logo was iconic—but was it metal? Recently Fast Co.Design decided that the 2016 race, already somewhat of a snoozer, lacked any real aesthetic oomph. In a stroke of brilliance, they commissioned venerated graphics designer Christophe Szpajdel to rebrand 11 presidential candidate’s logos, ranging from Hillary Clinton to Bernie Sanders, with black metal makeovers. According to Fast Co, “Szpadjel has spent the past 40 years distilling the complex socio-political platforms of over 7,000 black metal bands like Fistula, Arcturus, Old Man's Child, and Moonspell down to single, indelible wordmarks—albeit ones that usually contain a bloody Pentagram or an upside down cross somewhere in the design.” The results are hilarious (can you imagine Marco Rubio getting down to some Emperor?) and a fun spin on a race that already feels like it’s been going on for ages.

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Super PAC App: Your Pocket Political Lie Detector

MIT Media Lab grads roll out a tool for separating truth from fiction during a deluge of Super PAC funded campaign ads.


With Romney now the official Republican presidential nominee, and the election season in full steam, expect to see an ambush of political ads on television. How to cut through the noise and pull back the veil? The newly released "Super PAC App" aims to put fact-checking at your fingertips with "objective, third-party information"about who paid for the ad and at what price, and whether those claims are indeed based on facts.

Created by Jennifer Hollet and Dan Siegel as a class project at MIT's Media Lab, the free Super Pac App uses audio recognition technology similar to Shazam, enabling iPhone-users to identify the ad by funding organization and amount spent. It then directs them to nonpartisan sources like FactCheck.org and PolitiFact to see details about the veracity of the ad's claims.

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