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Goodyear Wants to Power Your Car Using Heat From the Tires

Regenerative braking might have a partner in crime with Goodyear’s regenerative tires.

Photo via Goodyear

We were all taught in middle and high school science classes that friction produces heat. One common example of this is the friction and heat created by car tires moving across pavement. Most of the time, that energy goes to waste, which electric car companies try to minimize in order to keep batteries charged.

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By: Alex Goldmark

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Tesla Motors has had a good couple days.
The electric car maker's Model S was given an absolutely glowing review and near-perfect score from Consumer Reports today. "This car performs better than anything we've ever tested before," the site reported. "It does just about everything really, really well."
It goes on to praise the Model S as one of the most energy-efficient, quiet, fun-to-drive cars of all time.
Inside, the car looks like something Marty McFly might have brought "back from the future" in place of his iconic fusion-powered DeLorean. A giant 17-inch touch screen glows in the center of the dashboard, controlling everything from high-res Google Earth maps to opening the sunroof.
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Want one now? You're not alone. Yesterday, Tesla Motors reported its first quarterly profit in the company's 10-year history, and delivered a record revenue, blowing earnings expectations out of the water. Following the earnings report, Tesla stock jumped almost 30 percent.
The downside? It ain't cheap. Yet.

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Why Electric Cars Will Succeed Even Though Six in Ten Americans Don't Want Them

Sure, Americans claim they don't want electric cars. But demand isn't the problem right now.


A new USA Today/Gallup poll asked Americans about their interest in electric cars. Fifty-seven percent of respondents said they “won't buy an all-electric car no matter the price of gas.”

USA Today uses those numbers to make the standard case that the electric car is doomed because it just doesn't appeal to the public.

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Gas Too Expensive? The Chevy Volt Gets 1,000 Miles per Tank

With a gallon of gas hovering around $4, the plug-in hybrid almost seems like the pragmatic option.

Gas is expensive these days. The national average is roughly $4 per gallon. Depending on where you are (and how big your tank is), filling up can cost anywhere from $40 to $100 and up. A Ford Excursion has a 44-gallon tank. Filling one of those up from empty in Los Angeles right now would cost almost $200.

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Are you suffering from range anxiety? There's an app for that.

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