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Veggies as Tasty as Candy: The Quest for the Perfect Tomato

If junk food is carefully engineered to be as addictive as possible, should scientists do the same for vegetables? Humans have evolved to love...


If junk food is carefully engineered to be as addictive as possible, should scientists do the same for vegetables? Humans have evolved to love sweetness; tens of thousands of years ago (or even much more recently), the calories that sugar provides might have meant survival. Now, the craving for sweetness drives the candy industry and growing waistlines. But sugar isn't the only source of a sweet taste, as Rachel Nuwer reports at the Smithsonian:

The sweetness of a farmer’s market strawberry or a hand-picked blueberry comes largely from volatiles, or chemical compounds in food that readily become fumes. Our nose picks up on and interacts with dozens of these flavorful fumes in any given food, perfuming each bite with a specific flavor profile. The sensations received by smell and taste receptors interact in the same area of the brain, the thalamus, where our brain processes them to project flavors such as sweetness.

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Feast Your Eyes: This Edible Display Uses Dried Fruit as Pixels

Like a craisin Lite Brite, this prototype from the University of Tokyo might one day customize displays with flavors and colors to match your mood.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGsOaweVjRU

At the same Japanese interaction design festival where we found forks that make music with your food, there was also a prototype edible display. Resembling a Lite Brite made of yogurt and dried fruit, the device translates digital coordinates into an edible drawing by depositing craisins into a circular dish.

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Dietary Supplements: Suspect Seafood, Mustard Madness, and Tastebud Training

Today's round-up of what we're reading at GOOD Food HQ. Enjoy!

Even if Japan's seafood isn't contaminated by nuclear radiation, the fear of contamination could have lasting effects.

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