GOOD

My Plan to Bring Tech into My Classroom to Put Students in Control of Their Own Learning Processes

A flipped classroom is a learning environment where the teacher does more facilitation as opposed to direct instruction.


As a social studies teacher at high school in a low-income neighborhood in Jacksonville, Florida I'm always looking for ways to boost student engagement and academic achievement. There are plenty of ways educators can do that, but in 2013 I'm determined to take advantage of all the ways technology can support what I'm teaching my students: I want to flip my class.

If you don't hang out in education circles, you're probably wondering what in the world it means to flip a class. A flipped classroom is a learning environment where the teacher does more facilitation as opposed to direct instruction.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

'Mystery Teacher Theater 2000' Contest Calls for Critiques of Khan Academy Videos

Critics say the videos are full of errors and emphasize procedures over concepts.

There's no denying Khan Academy has become an education juggernaut, reaching more than six million users every month. Founder Sal Khan recently pointed out that that's 10 times the number of all Harvard graduates since 1636. But while its "flipped classroom" approach has been touted in some circles as the future of learning, a growing number of educators are making the point that Khan's videos aren't a silver bullet. "Mystery Teacher Theater 2000," a contest sponsored by Justin Reich, a doctoral researcher at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Dan Meyer, a teacher and current Stanford math Ph.D. student, wants to "bring a critical eye to the Khan series by awarding a cash prize to the best video commentary on a Khan Academy video."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Will a Harvard Professor's New Technology Make College Lectures a Thing of the Past?

Thanks to Learning Catalytics, the "flipped classroom" and peer learning could revolutionize higher education.


Another sign that the college lecture might be dying: Harvard University physics professor Eric Mazur is championing the "flipped classroom," a model where information traditionally transferred during lectures is learned on a student's own time, and classroom time is spent discussing and applying knowledge to real-world situations. To make it easy for professors to transition out of lecture mode, Mazur has developed Learning Catalytics, an interactive software that enables them to make the most of student interactions and maximize the retention of knowledge.

Mazur sold attendees at the recent Building Learning Communities conference on this new approach by first asking them to identify something they're good at, and then having them explain how they mastered it. After the crowd shared, Mazur pointed out that no one said they'd learned by listening to lectures. Similarly, Mazur said, college students don't learn by taking notes during a lecture and then regurgitating information. They need to be able to discuss concepts, apply them to problems and get real-time feedback. Mazur says Learning Catalytics enables this process to take place.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles