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Taxi Drivers Revolt Against Uber in France, Courtney Love Dissents

Drivers feared for their economic livelihoods, so they took it to the streets.

Image via YouTube

Although Uber started in San Francisco less than five years ago, its growth has been meteoric, and its reach, international. But while Uber has had major success in American cities, it faces increasing resistance in Western Europe’s social welfare economies, namely in France. Just this morning, taxi drivers across the country revolted against the intrusion of Uber, some going so far as to burn tires and cars, then block roads.

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Why Geopolitical Pettiness Matters

Passive-agressive global politics is more than just posturing – it’s how our world works.

Screenshot from Reuters youtube channel

For most of us, passive aggression is a quintessentially interpersonal experience. Half-nasty notes on office refrigerators, the silent but exaggerated movement of chairs in crowded restaurants—these actions are a manifestation of the pettiness that can exist when individuals can't sublimate their anger into rational communication. It's the sort of festering emotion we like to think does not exist in the efficient superstructures of businesses or governments. Yet even the most austere and respectable institutions can act just like churlish humans. The latest, greatest example of this capacity for extra-human passive aggression comes from a recent spat between Belgium and France.

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France to Stop Trashing, Start Donating, All Unsold Supermarket Food

France’s new law bans stores from throwing away unsold food. Instead, it will be given away to those in need.

Image by Flickr user alistairas.

The French parliament passed legislation on Thursday that would ban supermarkets from trashing unsold food products. Instead, supermarkets will have to donate that food to charity groups that will then distribute it those in need. According to the AFP, some grocery stores would even destroy the food before throwing it away, making it completely inedible.

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A giant new development—covering about 200 acres—is planned for the countryside outside Paris, with a design that looks sustainable at first glance. The whole thing is covered in a sprawling green roof. The streets inside, inspired by classic European city centers, are walkable and bikeable, and have an integrated public transit system. But even though the designers have done many things right, all is not necessarily as green as it seems.

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