GOOD

A new report from the United Nations warns that climate change is threatening to shrink our global food supply. Extreme weather such as droughts and floods plus our own exploitation of natural resources might prevent the human race from being able to feed itself. The report also shows we are losing soil between 10 and 100 times faster than soil is forming. But one company in Finland might have found the solution.

Start-up company Solar Foods is ready if the day ever comes where we finally consume all of our resources thanks to a new protein powder they've created based on a concept by NASA. The company pulls carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by using carbon capture technology, then adds water, nutrients, vitamins, and electricity to the CO2, triggering a fermentation process that's not too different from beer, according to CNN. The finished result is a white, powdery, high-protein substance known as Solein.

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Innovation

40 Years ago, Arthur C. Clarke Accurately Predicted the Future of Technology

Now we’re just waiting on that communication with extra-terrestrial life.

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Videos

Welcome to the Future of Design: Love Maps, Nighttime Cities, and Workout Computers

Visionary, useful, and fantastical—this year's Istanbul Design Biennial offers thought-provoking projects reimagining “the manifesto.”

This year’s second annual Istanbul Design Biennial took on the idea of “the manifesto.” Designers from around the world were tasked with reimagining the traditionally text-centric medium, carefully considering their pieces’ function in the past, present, and, perhaps most importantly, the future. With Zoë Ryan (Art Institute of Chicago) at the curatorial helm, aided by Meredith Carruthers, the 53 projects currently on exhibition include a diverse array of manifestos reinvented as physical objects, useful services, participatory installations, contemplative art, and more.

Adhering to the apt theme of “The Future is Not What it Used to Be,” the designers’ works are wound throughout a historic venue in Turkey’s largest city, the Galata Greek Primary School, systematically arranged into departments by Ryan—the Personal Department, exploring issues affecting our personal lives; the Resource Department, including manifestos that question our relationships with the material world; the Norms and Standards Department, aimed at rethinking the status quo and daily life; and the Civil Relations Department, which investigates collective action and social practice. Visitors snaking through the Galata’s five floors are invited to collect materials, engage with installations, and share their own thoughts on the evolving role of design in society.

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Articles

A Look Back at our Public Interest Design Predictions for 2013

For PublicInterestDesign.org’s third annual year in review series, we’re chronicling initiatives shaping the field of public interest design. As was the case in previous years, this is not an exercise in trend-spotting, but instead a meditation initiatives poised to advance a growing field at the intersection of design and social change.

For PublicInterestDesign.org’s third annual year in review series, we’re chronicling initiatives shaping the field of public interest design. As was the case in previous years, this is not an exercise in trend-spotting, but instead a meditation initiatives poised to advance a growing field at the intersection of design and social change.

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Articles

WATCH: A Message From the Future

Eat more cereal, take advantage of nature, and get up off your chair and dance like a lunatic.

Eat more cereal, take advantage of nature, and get up off your chair and dance like a lunatic.

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Articles

The first time I truly used a networked computer I saw it as the way out. Instead of being enslaved to big corporations—as employees and consumers—we’d be able to work on our own time, create value directly for other networked people, and get out of the obligatory, expansionist race against the debt clock that was destroying our planet.

But once WIRED and the other technology business folks got wind of the coming digital age, they framed it quite differently. No, digital technology wouldn’t liberate us from the values of the Industrial Age; it would amplify them! Instead of letting NASDAQ deflate and die its natural death, we could use the promise of the dotcom era and the “long boom” of infinite expansion to pump some more steroids in there.

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