GOOD

Could This Be What the World’s First Truly Green City Looks Like?

A new project called OAS1S promises in the near future we’ll all be living in lush, garden communities.

Sure you’ve heard of green architecture, but what about a building made entirely from plants? A new proposal by Dutch experiential designer and architectural manager Raimond de Hullu (MSc), called OAS1S, promises that in the near future we might all be living in our very own garden homes. The project, which aspires to be the first 100 percent truly green building, offers up a vision of structures that are long and thin like trees with rooms stacked for maximum space (Think if government housing projects were modeled on Ferngully). The buildings would each be wrapped in foliage, and live “amongst a woodland within a city”—essentially a tree-based community within a larger metropolis.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

It's Not Where You're Going, It's How you Get There

A look at futuristic forms of transportation that have become reality.

At one point, we humans were fascinated with the invention of the wheel, but we're human. It's part of our make-up to constantly search for and invent what's next. Well, what's next doesn't always rely on the wheel. Who needs those when you can levitate to work or rocket to space?

The ever-increasing urban growth around the globe is fueling new forms of transportation, which will move us from A to B and even C in brilliant ways, not only helping the environment and the huge public need to get around, but---most importantly--- allowing us to skip out on traffic jams. Who cares about traffic when you have a jetpack?

Keep Reading Show less
Slideshows

Meet the Woman Making Sure the World Design Capital Has Business Cards

To the casual observer, there are plenty of indicators that Cape Town, South Africa deserves its title as "2014 World Design Capital": chic...

To the casual observer, there are plenty of indicators that Cape Town, South Africa deserves its title as "2014 World Design Capital": chic coffee shops with minimalist typography proliferate the city, a once disused bowling green is now an artfully laid-out organic farm, and the Woodstock Exchange's breezy open-air space feels delightfully incongruous in the industrial neighborhood where it sits.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles