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Antidepressants in U.S. Waterways Giving Fish Anxiety, Homicidal Behavior

Flowing into our rivers and streams, antidepressants from human waste is affecting fish behavior, making them anxious and anti-social.



Among the prescription drugs found in U.S. waterways, antidepressants routinely edge out all other medications discarded or excreted by an increasing percentage of Americans struggling with anxiety disorder.

New research indicates that all that foreign chemistry lining our waterways is having an adverse effect on fish behavior, plaguing them with anxiety, anti-social behavior, and homicidal tendency. The unpublished research, conducted by scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, exposed trace amounts of Prozac to young, developing fathead minnows and recorded the results.

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Science: You and Your Friends Have Similar Genes

A new study suggests that friendships may start at a genetic level—though some scientists say it's too soon to tell.


It's very likely that you and your friends have similar tastes in art and politics, which is no doubt due in large part to similarities in your educational backgrounds and upbringings. But new scientific research argues that both nurture and nature may have a hand in why you and your three best friends all love the new Grizzly Bear record.

Working at the University of California, San Diego, and singling out six genes, a team of researchers discovered that people tend to have more in common genetically with friends than non-friends.

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