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A GOOD Experiment: First Progress Report

Progress report on our Global Action Expirement

A short time ago I introduced the Global Action Experiment, a project here at GOOD that is close to my heart. Simply put, we are building a vibrant community of “doers” that are making a difference in the world. Our progress so far has been good and we have learned a lot about actions that work and others that fail to gain traction. As a reminder, our hypothesis is: engaging in actions with a purpose related to countries other than your own, no matter how informed you are, will connect you more deeply with the issues they are facing. In other words, participating in global actions will make you a better global neighbor.

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A GOOD Experiment

A year ago, I came to GOOD to help the company with its effort to establish a community, rather than just an audience. As I saw it, GOOD's view- once controversial- that living well and doing good weren't mutually exclusive had become part of the mainstream. How could GOOD take the next step and translate that into impact?

A year ago, I came to GOOD to help the company with its effort to establish a community, rather than just an audience. As I saw it, GOOD's view—once controversial—that living well and doing good weren't mutually exclusive, had become part of the mainstream. How could GOOD take the next step and translate that into impact?

How to accomplish impact certainly isn't obvious. The landscape is littered with companies that have failed to do it. Those that have survived have done so through becoming a neutral platform: whatever cause you have they will help you support. But at GOOD, which represents the values of global citizens, neutrality isn't an option.

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From School Science Fairs to Designing a Smartphone App That Diagnoses Malaria

These grad students designed Lifelens, an app that lets you snap picture of a blood sample to determine if it's infected with malaria.

What if you could take a picture of a blood sample with your smartphone and have an app tell you if someone has malaria. That's exactly what Lifelens, a breakthrough technology project designed by five young recent college grads and graduate students is able to do. Given the mortality rates of malaria across the developing world, the technology has the potential to save millions of lives.

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