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A new report from the Rhodium Group shows that the U.S. made a small amount of progress in the fight against climate change in 2019.

In a report called "Preliminary US Emissions Estimates for 2019" the independent research provider found that the U.S. greenhouse gas emissions fell by 2.1% in 2019 based on preliminary energy and economic data.

The news is positive being that estimates show there was a rise in greenhouse gasses of 3.4% in 2018.

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The Planet

Get Excited for the Surprising Environmental Upshot to Driverless Cars

Self-driving taxis won’t just change how we get around, they’ll change how we interact with our planet—for the better.

image via (cc) flickr user smoothgroover22

While once strictly the purview of science fiction, driverless cars are poised to become a major factor for the transportation industry in the coming years. And while we’re probably not quite ready to see nobody behind the wheel of the vehicle next to us just yet, the steady drip-drip of updates from high-profile autonomous automobile projects should be enough to get us comfortable with at least the basic idea that, yes, we’ll likely be sharing our roads with self-driving robotic cars in the not-too-distant future. For those out there that believe the thought of a driverless car is not the most appealing highway prospect, however, there’s some recently released good news that should make even the most ardently pro-human drivers think twice before pooh-poohing autonomous vehicles.

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Articles

The Downside to the 'Buy Less Stuff' Philosophy

Greener purchasing choices could cause the average gross domestic product of low-income countries to drop by more than 4 percent.


Often, the best green lifestyle advice boils down to a simple principle: “Buy less stuff.”

But according to a new analysis [PDF] from the Stockholm Environment Institute, scaling back consumption has negative consequences, too. Greener purchasing choices could cause the average gross domestic product of low-income countries to drop by more than 4 percent—the average amount a country’s GDP might be expected to grow in a given year. The GDP of the world's least-developed countries could take an even bigger hit, of more than 5 percent.

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