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A History of Economics from the English Premiere League

The most beautiful game’s team sponsors show the rise and fall of industries over time.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Since the English Premiere League relaunched in the 1992-1993 season, corporate sponsorships and advertisements have decorated the players’ uniforms (some so prominent that they are larger than the team’s crest or name).

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Twitter in the Classroom: Watch This Teacher Engage Shy Students in Learning History

Still skeptical about whether Twitter can help shy students? Meet L.A. middle school teacher Enrique Legaspi and his students.

\n\n\n\n\nStill skeptical about the value of using Twitter as a tool to engage introverted students in classroom lessons? You're not alone. A recent survey of almost 2,000 teachers found that half think that using Twitter (and Facebook) in the classroom "is harmful to the learning experience." But, Los Angeles history teacher Enrique Legaspi disagrees with the naysayers. Last year he went to a workshop that discussed ways to use Twitter in teaching and now his students—even the shy ones—at Hollenbeck Middle School in East L.A. are speaking up more.

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The Violent Consequences of Calling Obama a Monkey

Why a "little joke" is far more sinister than people think.


Yet another Republican official has been caught sending an email in which Barack Obama is depicted as a monkey, meaning yet another Republican official is now attempting to cover for her digital mistake by saying that she didn't intend her email to be racist. Here's a GOOD newsflash for anyone considering creating or transmitting an image of the president as a monkey or ape: Such a depiction will always be racist, and there's science and centuries of context to explain why.

Firstly, in order to really understand the hatred at the core of Obama-as-monkey imagery, just look at the history of comparing blacks to monkeys. Dr. Samuel Cartwright, a leading Louisiana physician from the late 1800s who used shoddy science to support the practice of slavery, once wrote of blacks, "[N]ot that the negro is a brute, or half-man and half brute, but a genuine human being, anatomically constructed, about the head and face, more like the monkey tribes and the lower order of animals than any other species of the genus man." In other words, blacks are humans, but the most monkey-like of humans, meaning it's alright to force them into bondage and beat them when necessary. Cartwright even advocated regular whippings in order to cure "drapetomania," a "disease" that caused slaves to try and escape.

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