GOOD

GOODCo Finalists: IT Innovators Disrupting Payments and Data Analysis

Square and Palantir Technology are changing the way we pay and how organizations think.



Information technology is one of the most disruptive forces in the economy today, subtly—and not so subtly—changing the way we do business. IT can break down barriers and speed up transactions, or gather and analyze more information than anyone had though manageable before to help make good decisions. These two GOOD Company finalists are shaping those two trends in ways that will affect your pocketbook very soon.

Square

Twitter, Square CEO and founder Jack Dorsey’s first company, changed the way people think about expressing ourselves on the internet and engaging with friends and strangers in a social network. Now, Dorsey is trying to perform a similar shakeup around the similarly fundamental act of paying for stuff. Founded in 2009, the company offers a number of products to streamline payments: Square, a credit card reader that virtually anyone can link to their bank account and use on their mobile phone or tablet with a flat commission, and now Car Case, which allows people to pay for purchases with their phone simply by identifying themselves to a cashier. The company will be able to integrate useful information into their products, from daily deals to menus, and create an increasingly robust consumer experience. By lowering the barriers of entry, Square is making it easier for entrepreneurs to start businesses, and the company’s decentralized business model promises to take power away from the largest banks and credit card companies and give more leverage to consumers.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Will PayPal Billionaire Peter Thiel's Team of College Dropouts Change Learning?

Meet Thiel's inaugural class of super-elite "20 Under 20" fellowship recipients.

In April, Peter Thiel, one of the co-founders of PayPal and the first major investor in Facebook, announced "20 Under 20," his experiment that will pay students from some of the nation's most elite colleges $100,000 each to drop out and start companies. Thiel's views on college degrees are pretty controversial—he believes they're unnecessary for talented, entrepreneurially-minded students. After sifting through 400 applications, Thiel announced his inaugural class of fellowship recipients and their projects on Wednesday.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

IBM's New Pipeline: Training High School Students

IBM and the City University of New York are teaming up to train future IT workers in New York City by opening a high school that goes up to grade 14.


Precocious New York City students who know they want to work in the tech sector have a new path from the classroom to industry. On Tuesday, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that the City University of New York (CUNY) and IBM would be joining forces to open a high school that goes from 9th up to 14th grade. (That's one more than 13th grade. Take that, Canada!)

Students who attend the school will graduate with both a high school diploma, an associate's degree, and the computer giant's most sincere wishes that they continue into they join the corporation as an employee. It won't quite be an engraved invitation, but certainly a preferred spot in the hiring queue.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles