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Anne Lamott once put it perfectly when she wrote, "You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do."

When it comes to Christianity, some practitioners believe that the words of Jesus Christ help them to be welcoming of people regardless of their race or sexuality. While others use the Bible to validate their own prejudices.

In fact, one of the reasons slavery was able to thrive in the South is that it aligned with teachings found in the Bible.

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1 in 7 New Marriages Are Now Interracial—But Biases Still Linger

No matter how much we tout the melting-pot concept, our "personal preferences" are often tinged with ingrained stereotypes.


According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, almost 15 percent of all new American marriages in 2008 were between people of two different races. There are now 4.8 million interracial marriages in the United States—about 1 in 12 marriages. That number has doubled in the past 30 years, and has risen especially sharply among black populations. Our acceptance threshold is rising too—about 83 percent of Americans say it is "all right for blacks and whites to date each other," compared with 48 percent in 1987. And 63 percent of those surveyed say it "would be fine" if a family member were to get hitched to someone of a different race. Young people actively approve of the trend; almost two-thirds of of Millennials said mixed-race families were "good for society."

But that doesn't mean that all races—or genders—are intermarrying at the same rate. Twenty-two percent of all black male newlyweds in 2008 married outside their race, compared with just nine percent of black females. Meanwhile, a full 40 percent of Asian female newlyweds married a person of another race in 2008, compared with just 20 percent of Asian males. (The gender differences were negligible with white and Hispanics.)

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