GOOD

The Dumb Photos You Share of Your Breakfast Can Actually Feed People

Free app, Feedie, will funnel 25 cents towards a nutritious meal for a child in South Africa every time you snap a photo of your food.

The waiter places a dish in front of you that sizzles with color. It’s beautiful. Your right hand twitches for your pocket where your phone is nestled. Nay. As much as you yearn to do it, it’s become gauche to take pops of the delectable eats you encounter. That’s where the new app Feedie comes in to save the day. It’s a free app tied to the Lunchbox Fund, a non-profit organization that provides meals to children in rural and township schools in South Africa, where, according to the Fund's website, approximately 65 percent of children live below the poverty line. Basically, it’s an Instagram for food, except every time you take a picture and share it, Feedie funnels 25 cents to the Lunchbox Fund, approximately the amount it takes to put together a nutritious meal for a child in South Africa.

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Pocket EPA: iPhone Gadget to Measure Environmental Hazards

New gizmo will measure local radiation, electromagnetic pollution, and whether or not food is organic.

It's a hazardous world out there. Some things we have control over—like the food we put on our plates—but other risks are harder to detect. Lapka Electronics sees an opportunity in our anxiety over contaminated environments and is soon bringing a device to market that holds some promise to mitigate the toxicity to which we're all exposed.

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App Stops Speeding with (Sloooooow) Music

To help speeders kick the hurried habit, this app slows down your music the faster you go, essentially annoying you into safer driving.


Looking for help lightening your lead foot?

OVK Slowdown is an iPhone app that plays your music, but also tracks your driving speed and location via GPS. If you go above the speed limit, the app starts to slow down your music. The faster you go, the slower—and more annoying—your music gets. If you top out at more than 6.2 miles per hour (that's 10 kmph) above the legal speed limit, the app shuts off your audio altogether. Watch the video below for a demonstration of distorted music as traffic safety incentive.

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