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Five Moments Teen Pop Stars Became Sex Symbols

In honor of Justin Bieber's post-puberty rebrand, here are some top moments of teen stars owning their sexual awakenings.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GuqB1BQVr4

On March 1, Justin Bieber turned 18 years old, and a few weeks later, he released his single, "Boyfriend." The song offers the same fantasy as always—he just wants a girlfriend to cuddle, and that girl is you, baby—but this time, the Biebs sounds smoky, breathy, seductive, wheedling while semi-rapping about fondue and swag over a stripped-down beat. His lyrics say "love," but his voice says "sex." In the song's video (a pretty blatant Timberlake knock-off), he's a mere shadow of his former self. Gone is the cheesy smile, the purple hoodie, the video games. Instead, there's lip-licking, waist-grabbing, and a scantily clad girl—no, woman—sitting atop his very, very fancy car. A new GQ profile calls out this calculated reinvention for what it is: part hormones, part rebrand.

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King Krule (aka Zoo Kid) Is a Teen Music Icon for Generation DIY

Move over, Bieber. Our favorite teen internet idol is England's King Krule.

At just 17, King Krule (also known as Zoo Kid), whose real name is Archy Marshall, has developed a reputation for singing heartbreaking tunes about love and despair that belie his youth. He writes his own music, records a lot of his songs in his London bedroom, and sports a filthy, ill-fitting white sweater in his one and only music video. In short, though he's exactly the opposite of Justin Bieber and other groomed, autotuned, bubblegum icons, he's also the kind of self-sufficient creative whiz people are finally beginning to respect.

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Bieber Fever Pitch: What Happens When a Justin Bieber Concert Is Free?

How much does it cost to be a Justin Bieber superfan? Sometimes, nothing but an iron will.


Justin Bieber is a Beatle with a Twitter handle. His fans are already stuff of legend and Internet meme. This morning in New York, his most devout followers displayed the dedication of the most diehard occupiers, lining up to see him perform for free.

I arrived at 6:45 a.m. to a soggy madhouse, also known as the Today Show's no-tickets-required Justin Bieber concert. It was just misting, mercifully, but it had been raining steadily off and on for almost 24 hours. Some fans had been there for two days in the pouring rain. Matt Lauer reported that by 4:30 a.m., the line was six blocks long. The crowd was equal parts screaming girls and ecstatic moms. (The founder of the group Moms4Bieber was the very first in line... on Monday.) There were girls whimpering in disappointment outside the police-guarded barricade; there were girls shaking in anticipation inside of it. There was pushing, yelling, snapping, shrieking.

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