GOOD

Could a Saharan Super-Skyscraper Be the Future of Urban Living?

How self-contained vertical cities can put our utopian ideals into action.

Artistic rendering on the Sand Tower

Earlier this year, the innovative French architectural design firms Nicholas Laisné Associés and OXO Architectes released conceptual plans for something called La Tour des Sables (The Sand Tower). The proposed project is a massive, self-contained, self-sustaining 1,400-foot tall city-tower to be constructed in the heart of Morocco’s slice of the Sahara desert. A mixture of 600 housing units, an equal amount of public green and recreational space, and even more office units (not to mention the hotel, restaurants, bars, and meteorological observatory on top of the tower), it could contain well over a thousand people. While the Sand Tower may be uniquely ambitious, the concept of a self-contained city-structure is a longtime utopian dream, and one that is becoming increasingly more relevant as the pressures of urbanization and environmental degradation become increasingly dire.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

A Friendly Game of International Border Subversion

Activists in Morocco and Algeria hope to play a volleyball game using the countries’ mutual border as a net

Of all the things to ever be lobbed across borders of rival countries, volleyballs may be the most benign. Activists in Morocco and Algeria are hoping a friendly volleyball game across their countries’ mutual border, closed since 1994, will foster goodwill between the two nations. A Facebook event created for the historic match, scheduled for November 29th, has garnered more than 3,600 RSVPs from people all over the world. Loubna Karroum, one of the match’s organizers, said they were inspired by a similar event that took place over another famous, heavily militarized border in the United States.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Exploring Invisible Architecture: Morocco's Answer to the High Line

Sometimes the most interesting explorations can be found through “invisible architecture”—the antithesis of "starchitecture."


Sometimes the most interesting explorations can be found through what I call “invisible architecture” or the discovery of what exists in the city but was once hidden to the naked eye. We’ve seen people discovering the formerly “invisible” in recent projects like the High Line in New York, which was always there, in a sense, but was just waiting to be discovered. At the same time, another invisible architecture project emerged, but in Fez, Morocco, and it calls upon visitors to look down and around rather than up and out.

The Fez River Project, spearheaded by award-winning architect Aziza Chaouni and her Bureau of Ecological Architecture & Systems of Tomorrow (Bureau EAST, now Aziza Chaouni Projects), revitalized the city by restoring and uncovering the Fez River, which runs through its center. Although the dense and labyrinthine medina of Fez has been a Unesco Heritage Site since 1981, the river was hidden under concrete until Chaouni’s project was unveiled (literally!) in 2008.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The GOOD Lunch: Morrocan Roasted Carrot Chickpea Quinoa Salad

Every Tuesday and Thursday in 2011, the GOOD team has pledged to take turns to cook and share a big bowl of soup or salad.

Today's GOOD Lunch salad was prepared by Carla Fernandez and was inspired by Closet Cooking (tagline: "Cooking in a Closet-Sized Kitchen").

Keep Reading Show less
Articles