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How Title IX Eliminated Coaching Jobs for Women—And How to Solve the Problem

Once men started wanting jobs coaching women, men started getting a disproportionate number of those jobs.

University of Tennessee women's basketball coach Pat Summit, the winningest college basketball coach in history

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4 Lessons Every Other Event Ever Should Learn From March Madness

The World Cup may be more popular and the World Series may be a longer-standing tradition, but no game or series can compete on sheer excitement.


Let's get this out of the way up front: The NCAA is a terrible, broken system. Its honchos reap massive profits on the backs of unpaid athletes. It punishes students for their parents' minor offenses while turning a blind eye to alleged crimes as serious as sexual assault. I fully support blowing up the entire framework of college sports and starting from scratch.

But damn, does the NCAA know how to throw a party.

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In the NCAA, a Free Plane Ticket Is a Crime, But Sexual Assault Isn't

Patrick Witt lost his shot at a Rhodes but not a chance to play in the biggest game of his career despite a serious accusation against him.


The story of Patrick Witt has all the makings of a media firestorm: football, the Ivy League, a Rhodes scholarship, and—as of this week—sex. Witt, Yale’s starting quarterback, was simultaneously hailed as a hero and mocked as a moron last fall, when he chose to forfeit his Rhodes interview in favor of playing against Harvard. Now, it appears the choice might not have been his in the first place.

Turns out the Rhodes committee had suspended Witt’s candidacy after learning that a classmate had accused him of sexual assault, according to reporting in The New York Times. Yale was notified of the decision but took no visible disciplinary action against Witt. He played in “The Game,” got trounced by the Ivy champion Crimson, and is no longer on Yale’s campus but has not graduated.

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Extra Credit: Ralph Nader Wants to End Athletic Scholarships

It's all about that college degree: what we're reading at GOOD Education HQ.


Just in time for the Elite Eight NCAA games, consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader is calling for an end to college athletic scholarships.

The head of the College Board, 71-year-old Gaston Caperton has announced he's stepping down in 2012. Caperton's held the job since 1999 and has overseen the number of students who take the SAT or AP exam skyrocket from 3 million to 7 million.

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