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See the World Rebalancing with PopTech's Data Viz App

Make your own New York Times "news memory map" and plug into data from young people in the developing world.

This year's PopTech conference in Camden, Maine is exploring how the world is "rebalancing" from volatile times to a new equilibrium, one we can't quite predict or grasp just yet. So naturally, organizers built a slick new iPad app to help us sort it all out.

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The New York Times' "Room for Debate" Continues Snubbing Minority Thinkers

In discussing the world's diverse population, the "paper of record" once again turns to a bunch of middle-aged white men.

We've told you before that the New York Times' "Room for Debate" section, in which thought leaders discuss the news of the day, has a problem when it comes to including diverse voices. Though the topics broached in Room for Debate are frequently near and dear to the hearts of people of all colors, for whatever reason, the Times has on several occasions neglected to include the opinions of even a single minority. We called it the paper's "white people problem"; Nation editor Chris Hayes called it their "non-white people" problem. Regardless of what you call it, it's a problem, and it doesn't appear to be getting any better.

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Rejected From College: If You're a Woman, A Less-Qualified Man Probably Took Your Spot

Men are getting a leg up in the admissions game, all in favor of "gender balance."


With college acceptance letters hitting mailboxes in full force this month, high school seniors are either celebrating being accepted to their dream school, or learning to love the idea of attending a safety school. But, for female students rejected from private liberal arts institutions, that rejection might have happened precisely because they're female. Yes, so-called male affirmative action continues to roll on in private college admissions, and it's all, supposedly, in pursuit of gender balance.

The issue first came to the forefront back in 2006 in "To All the Girls I've Rejected" a New York Times op-ed by Kenyon College dean of admissions and financial aid Jennifer Britz. Britz described the real angst of sitting in a room of admissions officers rejecting women in favor of sometimes less-stellar male applicants all because of school's desire for gender balance. Women earn 57 percent of bachelor's degrees and, if admitted according to merit, they'd easily be two-thirds (or more) of the students on a given campus. Apparently, in pursuit of diversity, campuses don't want the student body to be more than 60 percent women.

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Food for Thinkers: The Rise of White People Food

Does a constant focus by food writers on restaurants serving local, organic food mean we're missing out on a lot of delicious meals?

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The New York Times Kind of Misinterprets a Study About Tests and Learning

A new study claims testing helps kids get smarter—except, the tests that make a difference aren't the ones you think.


Didn't you just hate that one high school teacher who always seemed to give pop quizzes? Well, according to a piece in yesterday's New York Times, that teacher might have helped you get smarter.

The article, "To Really Learn, Quit Studying and Take a Test" cites a study just published in the journal Science, that found that if a student reads a passage and then immediately takes a test requiring them to recall what they read, a full week later they'll still remember 50 percent of the information.

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Catholics Find Common Ground With Muslims over Struggles in Manhattan

You know the controversy about Manhattan's Islamic community center? Two centuries ago, the Catholics went through the same thing.


In a recent interview with the Architectural Record, the architect behind Park 51 (the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque") notes he is a Lebanese Catholic, which all things considered, is not all that remarkable in New York. What may be remarkable in a city where hundreds of churches, temples, and mosques sit side by side and Atheists give millions to Catholic schools is the degree to which history has repeated itself almost 225 years later.

In a recent New York Times article the Rev. Kevin V. Madigan tells of the rocky start that his church St. Peter's (the oldest Catholic church in the city) had when it was first proposed.

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