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Intermission: MTV Explains the Internet in 1995

MTV's Kurt Loder reported on a "big deal technological fad" in 1995. Some of his wisdom still rings true.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmboEjwJwFU&feature=player_embedded

Nineties nostalgia is in full force this summer. GOOD ran a Now and Then series, Nickelodeon brought back our childhood shows with The 90s Are All That, and, as of yesterday, an early news report about the Internet has gone viral. This video features Kurt Loder interviewing people like Sandra Bullock, Coolio and "cyberjournalists," all explaining how this "big deal technological fad" is infiltrating our culture. The report even plays a clip of The Net: "We're sitting on the most perfect beach in the world, and all we can think about is 'Where can I hook up my modem?'" (Little did they know that this sentence would later sum up about 90 percent of our summer beach experiences.)

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Laughter's the Best Medicine: Comic Books to Help Joplin Kids Be Kids

A new comic book intends to help Joplin youth cope with life in a destroyed city by making them smile.

Whether created to educate students in Kabul or fight unemployment in New York City, comic books have become a go-to creative instrument for tackling serious problems. Now a team of artists is putting comic books to work in support of the young people in Joplin, Missouri affected by last month's tornadoes, which killed more than 100 people and displaced thousands.

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Young Professionals Head to Spin Class to Support Afterschool Program

The nation's oldest after school program, LA's BEST, is giving folks a workout—and letting them make a difference in the lives of kids.


Ready to sweat in spin class and do some good for the kids? One hundred young Los Angeles professionals are heading to Sports Club/LA today to participate in the second annual indoor cycling fundraiser for the nation's oldest after-school enrichment program, LA's BEST. The cyclists hope to raise $50,000, money that will help provide safe, supervised after-school education to low-income students across Los Angeles.

The program serves 28,000 kids at 180 elementary school sites across Los Angeles, working specifically in "neighborhoods most vulnerable to gangs, drugs, crime and at schools with the lowest student test scores." Stefanie Schwartz, Nickelodeon's vice president of marketing and production, said participating in the fundraiser is important to her because for so many low-income students LA's BEST "is their only exposure to amazing enrichment activities." David Freedman, the vice-chair of the BEST friends board echoes Schwartz sentiments, adding that his fund raising efforts allowed him to get his friends and coworkers involved in the program. "I think they’re great for showing up for the kids with their financial support," he said.

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