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The First Doughnut in Space is a Beautiful Thing

These Swedish brothers are space pastry pioneers.

Screenshot from YouTube user Stratolys

The first doughnut in space, a classic pink-sprinkled Homer Simpson special, soared majestically above this swiftly tilting blue orb we call Earth; lonely, silent, and brave, the pioneering pastry danced in the aether before crashing down to the terrestrial waters from which all life, and by extension all baked goods, spring. Like Icarus, the brash snack food reached its glory in defiance of the laws of god and man—doughnuts were never meant to fly, or so we are all told. But this particular doughnut had a destiny to fulfill, and aided by its one little friend, a GoPro camera, and a pair of helpful Swedish brothers, it ascended into both our hearts and the annals of history.

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After the Copenhagen Synagogue Shooting, This Muslim Community Is Responding in the Best Way Possible

A “Friendship Ring” made up of hundreds of people will surround an Oslo synagogue while worshipers pray.

image via (cc) flickr user sam-_-

The past several months have seen a series of attacks aimed at Jewish businesses and places of worship across Europe, including—but not limited to—the horrific murder of Jews buying groceries in a Paris market, and the recent shooting death of a volunteer security guard at Copenhagen’s Central Synagogue. In response to those acts of violence perpetrated against Jews, the Muslim community in Oslo, Norway is standing up—literally—to support and defend their Jewish neighbors.

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Designing a building from scratch has some advantages if you're trying to save energy; you can use the newest technology and invest in something awesome like the new Bullitt Center in Seattle. But what about all of the buildings that already exist? In Norway, two office buildings are being retrofitted so they will use no energy, and actually generate extra power.

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Anders Breivik Railed Against My Mom: When Anti-Women Rhetoric Hits Home

Seeing my mom's name in a terrorist's manifesto reminded me of the violent possibilities of anti-women rhetoric.


The initial shock of the Oslo terrorist attacks has given way to analysis. We are all struggling to make sense of the motivations of Anders Breivik, the man who confessed to the attacks yesterday. And Breivik has given us plenty to consider: Before carrying out the attacks, he published a 12-minute video and 1,500-page manifesto for popular consumption online. After looking at both, I've learned that Breivik was a 32-year-old Norwegian Christian fundamentalist who hated Muslims, Marxists, global capitalists, and my mom.

My mother, Ellen Willis, was a feminist writer and activist who founded the radical group Redstockings with Shulamith Firestone, among others, in 1969. She believed that the pursuit of pleasure was a much more potent recipe for social change than the sanctimonious politics of conservatives (and of some leftists, too). She invented the term "pro-sex feminism" and defended a woman's right to pursue a life that made her happy and fulfilled, even if that meant not having children.

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Anders Breivik and the War Against Ourselves

Breivik is a sobering reminder that the war we're fighting has no face or home. The war we're fighting is against unthinking, bilious rage.

In all of the horrific and heartbreaking coverage of Friday's violence in Norway, where Anders Behring Breivik allegedly bombed an Oslo government building before mowing down teenagers and twentysomethings at a nearby youth camp, the quote that made me close my browser and stop reading wasn't a gory description or a pulse-raising anecdote. It was this comment in the New York Times from 20-year-old Norweigan woman Hanne Remmen: "It’s worse because it was a Norwegian boy who killed all of those people."

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