Tour a Virtual Museum Housing Art Stolen or Destroyed by Conflict

Designer, grad student, and VR specialist Ziv Schneider has created a digital home for works both destroyed by war and stolen through famous heists.

As was made abundantly clear by recent video footage of the destruction of the Mosul Museum’s priceless artifact collection, ISIS’s mission of terror extends to the Middle East’s cultural legacy as well. Pulverizing centuries old treasures down to dust, this systematic annihilation has robbed future generations of both their heritage, and a chance to experience its greatest creations. As UNESCO and culturally invaluable sites across the world succumb to religious fanatics, from the Sufi saints statues of Mali to the (now bulldozed) 13th century city of Nimrud, preserving the memory of these lost, stolen, or destroyed works becomes all the more important. The Museum of Stolen Art, created by Ziv Schneider, a grad student at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, seeks to archive some of these lost works via a virtual museum exclusively dedicated to pieces currently MIA. Two of the first scheduled exhibits include works lost in the looting of Afghanistan and Iraq, which resonate strongly with Schneider, having grown up in nearby Israel. “What happened in Iraq—it was political instability that led to it,” Schneider recently explained to the Daily Dot “and a lot of the items were looted by Iraqis during the invasion [of 2003] because circumstances allowed for it. The condition of the archaeological items really deteriorated after Saddam Hussein lost power.” In Iraq these pieces were lost for good, while some in Afghanistan wound up back home. “A lot of it was looted by soldiers, and a lot of the items were returned. People were really surprised to see these pieces. They don’t relate them to Afghanistan. There’s a lot of intersection of cultures there, a lot of important historical pieces.”

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