GOOD

Pictures from Our Robot on Mars

Check out the earliest pictures of Mars from the Curiosity rover. Well done, humanity.

Curiosity, NASA's $2.5 billion Mars rover, landed on the Red Planet at about 10:30 p.m. Pacific Time last night after an 8-month, 352 million-mile journey and successful landing at the Gale Crater. Within minutes, it started beaming images back to Earth via orbiting satellites. Here are a few of the earliest shots. Curiosity's (excellent) Twitter feed informs us that we'll be getting higher resolution, color images later this week. For now, just marvel at the fact that you're looking at pictures taken by a robot we put on a planet more than 141 million miles from our sun. This is truly one of the most interesting things humanity's up to right now.

Keep Reading Show less
Slideshows

Dubai Student Designs Mobile Prenatal Care Device

This 20-year-old Dubai student's new mobile device could make childbirth much safer in developing countries.

It’s not hard to guess from his technology competition name—The Hex Pistols—that 20-year-old Shawn Frank is a fan of music. He's also a strong advocate of ensuring that women in developing nations have access to quality prenatal care. Six months ago, while walking to an internship, Frank came up with the idea for momEcare, a mobile device that helps provide medical assistance to pregnant women who can't get to a hospital. Now Frank, who just graduated from the computer science program at the University of Wollongong in Dubai, is headed to Microsoft's Imagine Cup, a technology competition for socially conscious high school and college students happening next week in New York City (we've covered the other young finalists here, here and here). I caught up with him to find out what first sparked his interest in technology and learn more about how momEcare works.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Intermission: Did van Gogh Paint the Chicago Sky Today?

Doom and gloom above Chicago makes for a rather beautiful sight. If the apocalypse looks like this, it might not be so bad.

We can't decide between Vincent van Gogh or Edvard Munch, but we do know the sky above Chicago right now looks like the canvas from some old master. To be honest, it also looks a bit ominous, so we're glad we're not there. It's a nice picture to look at from where we sit in perma-moderate Los Angeles, though.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Visualizing the Proliferation of Pictures in Magazines

The image above features one full issue from every five years of Popular Science's publication, from 1882 to 2007.


Over at the Software Studies Initiative, William Huber, Tara Zepel, and Lev Manovich have analyzed the changing layouts of the magazines Science and Popular Science.

The image above features one full issue from every five years of Popular Science's publication, from 1882 to 2007. They're arranged in order of publication, from top left to bottom right. As you can see, there's a progression: Over the years, Popular Science has become very visual—with more and more images relative to text.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles