GOOD

Is A Futuristic London Right Around The Corner?

Potential designs for a new bridge over the Thames could radically transform the city’s landscape.

London may be getting a flashy new edition to its already glittering Nine Elms District. This past Monday 74 potential designs for a £40m pedestrian and cycling bridge between Nine Elms and Pimlico, Southwest London, were unveiled at the Westminster Boating Base on Grosvenor Road. Out of 74, four will be shortlisted in March. In the meantime, they are being displayed anonymously to comply with EU competition rules. “This ensures reputations play no part and that the designs themselves are the sole focus of attention,” the exhibition’s organizers told The Guardian this week. The entrants vary from practical green walkways to something straight out of The Matrix.

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GOOD Ideas for Cities: In San Francisco, City Officials and Designers Are Like Peas and Carrots

After working with GOOD to produce three events pairing local designers with city officials, a group in San Francisco is expanding the program.

As GOOD Ideas for Cities continues its international quest to encourage and tease out fascinating design solutions to urban problems, the program has established itself as a unique model that initiates viable, meaningful change. For the past three years, the team has worked with a group in San Francisco on three events dubbed GOOD Design. Now that San Francisco-based group headed by the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has taken the GOOD Ideas for Cities concept and run with it, producing their own spin on the initiative that goes beyond a single annual event.

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The Design Difference: Using Design to Conduct a Problem-Solving Workshop

In the second part of our series, we share the process and tools that helped a group of designers create ideas for an underserved urban community.

GOOD was asked to attend The Design Difference, a charrette held by the Japan Society, Common Ground, and the Designers Accord. In this series, we're examining design solutions to social problems and ways for designers to contribute pro bono work for the proposed solutions. Read the first post here.

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