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Three Ways to Make a Difference For Public Education in 2014

The most important thing we can do to restore equal opportunity in our nation is strengthen public education.


It's been a little over five years since a financial crisis pushed our economy to the brink of disaster. Thankfully we didn't fall into the abyss, but the recovery hasn't been equally shared among all Americans. While long term unemployment remains perilously high and middle class families struggle to pay their bills, a fortunate few enjoy unprecedented prosperity.

It's not our imagination; inequality in America really is growing wider. In fact, the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality recently reported that the U.S. now ranks third among all advanced nations in the level of income inequality. This dangerous trend threatens our country's stability and one of our most important valuesour commitment to equal opportunity for every person. That's why President Obama recently called inequality the most serious threat to the American Dream.

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Waiting For Spider-Man? New Marvel Comic Features Charter School Lottery

With his application to a charter school, the new Spider-Man, Miles Morales, really is a 21st century teen.


It looks like Marvel's commitment to making the 21st-century Spider-Man more diverse "in background and experience" goes beyond replacing a killed-off Peter Parker with half-black, half-Latino teen Miles Morales. In Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, which debuts in September, the Brooklyn-born Morales also participates in a high-pressure charter school lottery similar to those seen in the documentary Waiting For "Superman".

Thanks to a preview from Comic Book Resources, we get to see Morales and his parents waiting anxiously for their lottery number to come up. The number 42 is drawn, but does that mean that Morales is in the charter or not? Without the accompanying words, it's hard to tell for sure:

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Lights, Camera, Action: Los Angeles Parents Film PSA About the School Funding Crisis

Parents at Melrose Avenue Elementary pooled their entertainment industry talents to create a video that drives home a point: Schools need money.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU1zdCfu5Mw

"When your company does well do you fire your best employees?" That's one of the questions asked in the above public service announcement about education funding produced by parents at Melrose Avenue Elementary, a science, technology, engineering, and math magnet school in Los Angeles. Almost 70 percent of the school's 339 students are children of color and another 70 percent receive reduced or free lunch—and in 2010 the school improved 124 points on the State of California's Academic Performance Index, the biggest gains of any public school in the state.

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