GOOD

19 Years After the Rwandan Genocide, Educating Women Is Key to Rebuilding

Nineteen years after the genocide against Tutsis, Rwanda is fighting to live by educating young women.


This month marks 19 years since the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed an estimated 1 million people in 100 days, devastating the country and its people. While remembrance events are held globally throughout the month of April, it is in our land-locked East African country where tributes are felt at the deepest, most profound level.

As a native Rwandan and as the country director for the Akilah Institute for Women, Rwanda's first-ever women's college that's investing in the education of the most promising future professionals and leaders of East Africa, I know the importance of ensuring our students reflect on this tragic part of our history.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

What New York Architects Can Learn From Rwanda

Buildings that fail, safely Hurricane Sandy laid bare the mythology of American exceptionalism, and the message last October was clear: New...

Buildings that fail, safely

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Investing in the Education of East Africa's Most Promising Young Leaders: Women

The Akilah Institute's program in Rwanda teaches women the hard and soft skills necessary to work in a demanding professional economy.

While the debate continues for how to really truly empower marginalized women, Nobel laureates, political leaders, and celebrity NGO founders all agree that an investment with the possibility of infinite returns is the investment in young women. At the nonprofit Akilah Institute for Women, we know this first hand because we’re investing in the education of East Africa's most promising future professionals and leaders.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

As TED lent out the know-how and raw materials for local and regional versions of its conference to be held all over the world-a program call TEDx-web videos of speeches from those satellite events are piling onto TEDx's YouTube channel.One of the latest additions features Elizabeth Davis, a twenty-something educator who moved from Nashville to Rwanda right after graduating from Vanderbilt University. Davis is now the executive director of The Akilah Institute for Women, a vocational school that's taking a smart approach to career education in Africa.It's twist: It's offering women in the nation recovering from the horror of genocide the skills they need to work in the hospitality industry, the sector that the Rwandan government fingered as the largest potential growth area in the country.Here's the setup of the problem Rwanda faced, which Akilah will attempt to fill:
The hospitality industry is actually the fastest growing sector of Rwanada's economy. They are expecting that by 2020 the hospitality industry will have brought in over $650 million in investment into Rwanda. … Because of the genocide and because of the lack of adequate education, the government estimates that they need to train 5,000 to 6,000 people this year to fill the jobs that are in the hospitality industry. So, the demand and the jobs are there, but they don't have the education system.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7P_Rr-td7N4

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Bikes to Rwanda

Lugging huge bags of coffee through the unpaved hills of Rwanda to a processing plant was back-breaking work for the Karaba coffee co-op. In this original GOOD video see how a collaboration between Karaba and a Portland, Oregon, coffee roaster has solved that problem, boosted production, and given birth..

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPReMcBTF2MLugging huge bags of coffee through the unpaved hills of Rwanda to a processing plant was back-breaking work for the Karaba coffee co-op. In this original GOOD video see how a collaboration between Karaba and a Portland, Oregon, coffee roaster has solved that problem, boosted production, and given birth to a new non-profit.

Articles