GOOD

Education: Morning Roundup, Laura Bush Is Looking for Great Principals

Laura Bush announces principal-training effort, Obama's loner school year proposal faces reality, and the Gates Foundation targets college graduation.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Yesterday, the city of Chicago announced a pilot program to introduce extended school days at 15 elementary schools over the coming school year. In total, 90 minutes would be added in the form of 35 minutes of online reading courses, 35 minutes of online math courses, and 20 minutes of free time—for a grand total of 70 extra minutes of actual learning. During that period of time the children will be supervised by adults not affiliated with those pesky teachers' unions.

The initiative is one of many proposed and already underway to look at the effect of more time spent in school on the quality of learning. Last year, President Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan called for extended school years and longer days to help cut the gap in achievement between U.S. children and those from other nations. In February, the school board in Houston approved a pilot program for an extended school year, which would add two weeks to the calendar; it's superintendent cited longer years at both YES and KIPP charter schools as inspiration for the move.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles


If you're anything like most Americans, you associate the summer with feelings of creativity and liberation and the school year with misery and hard work. And its precisely the "school is work, summer is play" philosophy that's gotten our kids into trouble, according to this week's Time.

Whereas many of the world's children attend school for far longer (by as much as four weeks in some places), ours sit idle lounging poolside—or, more likely, perched in front of a screen for vast swaths of the three-month holiday. Called the summer slide, while all kids lose some of what they acquired during the school year, it's especially perilous for poor kids, who often lack the resources to afford expensive enrichment activities.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles