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How the American School System Can Train Kids for High-Tech Jobs

Unemployment is high, but there are tons of open jobs in engineering and science. Here's how America's school system can fill the gap.

In May of 2010, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported an estimated 2.6 million jobs were unfilled. In the heart of the worst American recession in decades, with unemployment rates hovering at nine percent, there were over two million unfilled jobs. Why the contradiction? Many of these unfilled positions were in industries such as healthcare, aerospace, advanced precision manufacturing, scientific laboratory occupations, and computer-related design jobs which require knowledge of the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

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Al Gore to Tackle STEM Education in Online Townhall

The Former Vice President will drum up excitement for science, technology, engineering, and math.


Can former Vice President Al Gore do for STEM education what he did for environmental awareness? No, he's not filming a science, technology, engineering, and math documentary with director Davis Guggenheim. Instead, Gore's hoping to spark student interest in STEM fields by hosting "Math, Science and the Future of Our Nation," a global online town hall on Wednesday, November 17th.

According to the National Science Foundation, 80 percent of the jobs created over the next decade will require math and science skills. So, Gore, and his partners at Time Warner Cable's philanthropic arm, Connect a Million Minds, hope to interest and excite young people from around the world through conversations with the leading minds in STEM fields-experts like astronaut Sally Ride and inventor Dean Kamen. Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage from the Discovery Channel's MythBuster's team are also participating and will surely bring a dose of pop culture cool to the dialogue.

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Education: Morning Roundup, No Rules Apply at Manhattan's Free School

Manhattan's Free School has 23 students, ages 5 to 18, a sliding tuition scale, and no rules.

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