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Fewer Than Half of Americans Think Their Taxes Are Too High

Americans are the happiest they've been about their tax rates in quite a while.


Americans are the happiest they've been about their tax rates in quite a while. Just in time for Tax Day, a new Gallup poll shows 47 percent of Americans think their tax rate is "about right." Asked separately about this year's income tax, nearly six in 10 Americans considered their payment "fair." The percentage of Americans who think their taxes are too high is 46 percent, the lowest rate in the past decade. Low-income Americans, probably because of tough economic times, are the most dissatisfied with their rates—significantly more than they were in 2009.

Unsurprisingly, Americans' satisfaction with their taxes spiked in the early aughts, right after President Bush passed the first round of federal tax cuts. But why do fewer people than last year think their taxes are too high? It may very well be the shift in a national conversation—from a Tea Party obsession with spending to a focus on the wealth gap ushered in by Occupy Wall Street. It could be that people are feeling the effects of spending cuts in their daily lives, from struggling schools to transportation fare hikes (although a good number of Americans have no idea where their taxes go). Either way, Republicans set on cutting taxes even more should pay close attention to these numbers: The poor, not the rich, are dissatisfied with their tax rates. The wealthy can admit they're doing just fine.

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Why Occupy Wall Street Needs to Take Democrats Up on Their Offer Why Occupy Wall Street Needs Democratic Friends in Congress

Occupy Wall Streeters may be angry with Washington lawmakers, but they still need to join 'em before they can beat 'em.


Occupy Wall Street has already started to shape the language of the 2012 elections. Major Democrats—including Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden, and even the president—have expressed solidarity with the movement. Other members of Congress, like Raul Grijalva and Keith Ellison, have offered their support, too, and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is promoting a petition to seek 100,000 supporters to declare their support for the protesters.

Does Occupy Wall Street want the Democrats' help? Maybe, maybe not. But they should. The growing movement needs to have friends in Washington if it wants to achieve any of its goals.

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The Losers' Debt: What Occupy Wall Street Owes to the Tea Party

How the Tea Party's successful fight against help for debt-ridden Americans set the stage for Occupy Wall Street.


As the ranks of Occupy Wall Street swell, the inevitable comparisons to the Tea Party have led conservative agitators whose demonstrations catalyzed opposition to President Obama to deny any similarities between the two movements. They shouldn’t: Without the Tea Party, Occupy Wall Street wouldn’t exist.

That's not because the Don’t Tread On Me crowd was first to voice criticism of the economy, but because their success as advocates for the lenders of the world put the screws to our economy—and the very debt-ridden people whose voices are carried by Occupy Wall Street.

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Sarah Palin, Tea Partier in Name Only, Defends Big Oil Subsidies

Sarah Palin thinks that $4 billion is "just a drop in the bucket." Would her Tea Party supporters agree?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gIr1Kp05PQ

Buried in the odd poetry of Sarah Palin's live commentary on oil subsidies is this bombshell:

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Ku Klux Klan Says It Doesn't Condone Tea Party or Koran Burning

The famous hate group wants you to know it's not crazy like those other wingnuts.

A clear sign that perhaps you've gone off the deep end? When even the Ku Klux Klan tries to distance itself from your actions.

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