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Uh Oh, Ann Romney Wants to Champion Education

According to Romney, all we need to fix education is to have more charters and get rid of teachers unions.


It's become a tradition for the First Lady to become an advocate for an issue most Americans can get behind. With her "Let’s Move!" childhood obesity campaign, First Lady Michelle Obama's brought some fun to healthy eating healthy and getting fit—she got Beyoncé on board and Mrs. O actually did the Dougie with middle schoolers in Washington D.C. last spring. Well, it turns out that if she becomes First Lady, Ann Romney wants to be involved with schools and kids, too. In a Q&A with Good Housekeeping, Romney revealed that she intends to focus on education and at-risk kids if her husband wins the Presidency.

Romney told the magazine that she's "seen what happens to people's lives if they don't get a proper education." Romney's solutions, however, seemed to have missed the memo on focusing on a non-controversial, unifying solution. Instead of focusing on, for example, promoting reading in schools like Laura Bush—no matter how you felt about President George W. Bush, no one could argue that kids shouldn't read more—according to Romney, we just need to get rid of teachers unions and have more charter schools.

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Democracy (Not) at Work in Chicago: The Teacher Strike Is Missing Some Important Voices

Wait, shouldn't parents and students be part of this movement too?

This week Americans have been watching images and listening intently to reports of the Chicago Public Schools teacher strike. Being the home to President Barack Obama and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel—once regarded as the President’s right hand man—the Windy City's strike has political, economic, education, and teachers union officials watching closely to see what unfolds. As a parent—full disclosure: I have family members attending school and former students working in CPS— educator, and public school advocate, I've notice two major players missing from the media coverage and picket lines: Parents and students.

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By Striking, Chicago Teachers Put Children First

Walking out over pay and evaluation underscores the real problems in the school system.


Is it Groundhog Day for the Chicago Public Schools? Back in 1987, the city's teachers went on a 19-day strike over pay and class size. Sunday night, ongoing contract talks between Mayor Rahm Emanuel's team—Chicago schools are under mayoral control—and the Chicago Teacher's Union fell apart, seemingly over the same issues. Emanuel says the strike is the "wrong choice for children," but the biggest strike in a generation isn't just about a fatter paycheck and more benefits.

Sure, Chicago's 26,000 teachers are angry over Emanuel and his school CEO, Jean Claude Brizard, putting the brakes on a promised 4 percent raise, being told they needed to work a longer school day without adequate compensation, and standardized test scores becoming 25 percent of teacher evaluations, but Phil Cantor, a science teacher and strike captain at North-Grand High School told Democracy Now that the contract negotiations over pay aren't the biggest factor in the strike.

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Wisconsin Students Planning School Walkout to Protest End of Collective Bargaining

Students are responding to Scott Walker's plan to end collective bargaining by planning a school walkout—and they want it to go national.


Thanks to a controversial legislative maneuver, Wisconsin's Republican Governor Scott Walker's plan to end collective bargaining for his public employees passed the state senate Wednesday night. Now, in a stunning show of solidarity with their teachers—who, as union members, now have no bargaining rights—Wisconsin's high school students are planning a grassroots school walkout, and they want to take their protest national.

Wisconsin Students in Solidarity is asking for the nationwide walkout to happen this Friday, March 11, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. local time. Less than 12 hours after being formed, the Facebook event, Nationwide Student Walkout, has almost 2,000 "attendees" from across the country and student-led copycat groups and events are springing up on the social media hub.

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