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Five Moments Teen Pop Stars Became Sex Symbols

In honor of Justin Bieber's post-puberty rebrand, here are some top moments of teen stars owning their sexual awakenings.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GuqB1BQVr4

On March 1, Justin Bieber turned 18 years old, and a few weeks later, he released his single, "Boyfriend." The song offers the same fantasy as always—he just wants a girlfriend to cuddle, and that girl is you, baby—but this time, the Biebs sounds smoky, breathy, seductive, wheedling while semi-rapping about fondue and swag over a stripped-down beat. His lyrics say "love," but his voice says "sex." In the song's video (a pretty blatant Timberlake knock-off), he's a mere shadow of his former self. Gone is the cheesy smile, the purple hoodie, the video games. Instead, there's lip-licking, waist-grabbing, and a scantily clad girl—no, woman—sitting atop his very, very fancy car. A new GQ profile calls out this calculated reinvention for what it is: part hormones, part rebrand.

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Teen Sex Is Getting Safer: More Kids Use Condoms Than Ever Before

High school kids are still boning at the same rate they were 11 years ago, but they're getting smarter about it.


Here's a statistic to temper the perennial hysteria surrounding teen sex: condom use among teenage boys is on the rise.

As part of its National Survey of Family Growth, the CDC discovered that eight in 10 teen boys ages 15 to 19 reported they had used condoms during their first sexual experience. That's 9 percent more teenagers than the last time the CDC checked in, back in 2002. High school kids are still boning at the same rate they were 11 years ago—a little more than 40 percent for both genders—but they're getting smarter about it. Besides the rise of rubbers and the decline of teen pregnancy, the study also found that 16 percent of teen males "double up"—that is, use a condom in combination with a female partner's hormonal method—up from 10 percent in 2002.

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Pols Get the Memo That Teen Sexters Are Not Sex Offenders

Lawmakers are thankfully starting to see the nuance in cases of teen sexting run amok.


You know how 17-year-old kids are getting slapped with sex-offender charges, simply because they're texting each other naked photos?

Think that's bullshit? Me too. And so do a handful of states that are customizing their laws to be more lenient on teens who go overboard with the sexy-texts. New York is the latest to create legislation treating a case differently when juveniles are found guilty of distributing naked or sexually explicit photos of themselves or others. Brooklyn assemblyman Alan Maisel co-sponsored the "Cyber Crime Youth Rescue Act." The point, he said, is to keep teenagers from "getting themselves into serious trouble for adolescent behavior."

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