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Now Free, Ex-Guantánamo Inmates Celebrate With a Double-Wedding

Adel bin Muhammad El Ouerghi and Omar Abdelhadi Faraj will marry their brides at a joint ceremony in Montevideo, Uruguay.

Omar Abdelhadi Faraj and Adel bin Muhammad El Ouerghi.

A pair of former Guantánamo inmates, who have now settled in Uruguay after being released from the prison, will be getting married to Uruguayan Muslim converts in a double-wedding ceremony in June. The men, named Adel bin Muhammad El Ouerghi and Omar Abdelhadi Faraj, are two of six former detainees who have found a refuge in Uruguay, at the invitation of the president, Jose Mujica. The imam who will be officiating the ceremony, Samir Selim, told the Associated Press that it will take place at a mosque in Montevideo—the same mosque where El Ouerghi and Faraj met their wives-to-be.

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How the Four-Leaf Clover Became a New Symbol for Gay Rights in Uruguay

A Uruguay native living in New York has shaken up the establishment in his home country and established a new symbol for equality.

I’m sipping iced coffee at a Brooklyn café with Diego Palma, a 27-year-old Uruguay native living in New York. On the other side of the hemisphere, an open letter he wrote last week has shaken up the Uruguayan establishment and helped usher in the four-leaf clover as a new symbol of diversity and equality. Move over pink triangle and rainbow flag, you have company.

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Free Flowing: How to Keep Our Water Supply Public

Italians have voted not to let private companies take over their public water supply. Our fight in the U.S. is much quieter.

The debate around water privatization has been raging for a while, and the global voice to keep water a public good has been heard loud and clear in the last year or so. Just last month, 96 percent of Italian voters elected to keep their water supply in the public domain. The vote was in reaction to Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi passing a law that would allow private companies to buy up their country's public water utilities.

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