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7 Places Where Citizens Got Loud in 2014

Here’s why this was the year of the protest.

In recent years, amid the rise of social media and online petitions, it’s been easy to feel like the transformative and successful movements of the past century—the civil rights movement, anti-apartheid protests, and anti-Vietnam War protests—were destined to become relics of history. However, if there was ever a year to debunk the claims of “slacktivism” and “armchair activism” that have proliferated during the internet era, 2014 was it.

In many ways, the anti-government protests in Turkey and the anti-sexual harassment protests in India in 2013 hinted at the groundswell of protests that would follow from West Africa to Eastern Europe to Central America. Protesters boldly challenged entire governments, hegemonies, and systemic injustices in discrete ways that somehow felt greater than the sum of their grievances. Though not all were nonviolent, most of the protests demonstrated an impassioned form of civic engagement that will leave indelible imprints upon the history books of the future.

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Year in Review 2010: Crazy, Outrageous, and Just Plain Ridiculous Buildings

Let’s look back at a year of wild and wacky architectural achievements—from the super-size to the super-tall to the super-expensive.

Despite a global economic crisis that slowed the construction industry to a halt, a bevy of supersize, supertall, super-expensive buildings managed to erect themselves around the world during the past year. The world's tallest building was completed in 2010, as was the world's new tallest tower, plus the largest private development in the U.S., and the world's first billion-dollar house. Now as for whether or not all these buildings are actually occupied... well, that’s a different story entirely. Let’s look back at a year of wild and wacky architectural achievements (and a few that have yet to be seen).

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The 2022 World Cup Will Not Be Gay Friendly

The president of FIFA is warning gay soccer fans not to do anything too gay at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

The president of FIFA is warning gay soccer fans not to do anything too gay at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

[Sepp Blatter] noted that the world's biggest soccer tournament will have to adjust to more than just the sweltering desert heat when it takes its party-like atmosphere to the Middle East in 2022.

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