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How to Solve Dhaka's Serious Water Crisis by Harvesting Rainwater

Dhaka, Bangladesh is running out of water, fast. So residents are turning to the sky for help.


The capital of Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a critical water problem. There isn't enough of it.

According to a study by the Institute of Water Modeling, based in Dhaka, the groundwater level is falling by three meters per year. The groundwater is now 60 meters down below the surface. That's compared to 10 meters in 1970. The situation is getting so bad that, last summer, the Government of Bangladesh deployed troops to manage water distribution.

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#18DaysInEgypt, A Crowd-Sourced, Social Media Fueled Documentary in the Making

Using new technology and social media sites like Twitter and YouTube, a group of documentarians is creating a history of the revolutions.

All eyes remain on the Middle East. And for good reason. The protests in Egypt last month ended 30 years of rule by Hosni Mubarak in just 18 days. Egypt’s proverbial tip of the iceberg resulted from the so-called “Jasmine Revolution” in Tunisia, where after 23 years, President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali was forced out of office after street protests erupted against his leadership. Now it's time to start collecting a history of these swift revolutions. And you can participate!

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India, Japan Join Forces to Build "Green Cities"

Japan is using their energy efficiency know-how—and corporate tech—to help India build "green cities." And China doesn't like it.

The Japanese government announced yesterday that it would sign a free trade agreement with India that would eliminate 94 percent of trade tariffs over the next decade. The partnership between two of Asia's leading innovators runs much deeper than sending goods across the boarder though. It's also sprouting a network of "green cities."

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Forget the American Dream, Collaborative Consumption is a Better Path for Developing Countries Why the American Dream Doesn't Work in Developing Countries

As India and other countries develop, they're trying to be more American and individualistic. But that's a big mistake.

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Is India Really a Hotbed for Social Enterprise?

Is India better at producing social entrepreneurs than other countries? The recent track record supports the claim. Here are a few reason why.


If you know anything at all about social enterprise, you are probably familiar with the fact that many of the case studies cited as successful are Indian in origin. Case in point: Aravind Eyecare, Jaipur Rugs, Barefoot College, d.Light. It makes you wonder: Is India better at producing social entrepreneurs than other countries? Is there something in the water? And if India really has cornered the social enterprise market, how did they do it?

First, let’s look at what we know. India is massive. It’s bursting at the seams with people, and because one out of every six people on the planet is an Indian, we are statistically more likely to stumble upon Indians anywhere—and some of those people are bound to be social entrepreneurs, right? Of course, a big pile of people does not explain why social enterprises often thrive in India, and the policy environment certainly doesn’t help: There are no freebies for social enterprise, no special legal structures (like the L3C here in the United States or the CiC in the U.K.), and few policies that help enterprises get funding. In fact, some might say that Indian social enterprises have succeeded in spite of policy, not because of it.

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