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This Formerly Homeless Harvard Grad Is Using Her Story To Change How We Help The Homeless

"She's helping others with the skills she developed." #ProjectLiteracy

Photo by Peretz Partensky/Flickr.

It’s difficult not to be dazzled by the accomplishments of Connie Chung. The 40-year-old is a published author with a bachelor’s degree from UC, Berkeley, and three graduate degrees from Harvard: two master’s degrees and a doctorate of education. Given her academic prowess, one might be surprised to find that Chung spent six years of her youth homeless and alone on the streets of Los Angeles.

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My Student Wrote ‘My Brother Dead.’ I Corrected His Grammar

When compassion is an occupational hazard

IN HIS PAPER, MY STUDENT HAD WRITTEN “MY BROTHER DEAD.” I circled “dead” and wrote the following note in the margin: “Died. You need a past tense verb here, not an adjective. Your brother died.”

“My mom left and me and my siblings shuffled into the back of a government car to go to foster care,” wrote another. I underlined the first part of the sentence, adding, “My siblings and I.”

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Education

A Deaf-Blind Lawyer Wants to Know Why Surfboards Are Safer Than Classrooms

After braving ski slopes, Harvard, and the White House, improving school design may be her toughest challenge yet

I met Haben Girma, 28, a disability rights lawyer and the first deaf-blind graduate of Harvard Law School, after she’d just skied down Powder Mountain in Eden, Utah. She was a keynote speaker at a conference taking place there—telling about 150 attendees, including me, about her life as a deaf-blind advocate for people with disabilities.

That afternoon, Girma had skillfully negotiated that difficult slope, holding hands with a man she’d just met. He signed into her hand whether to turn left or right, slow down, or stop. When I sat with her, typing my questions into a wireless keyboard that Girma could read on her Bluetooth electronic braille display, I asked her what it felt like to ski. She answered like any of us would: “It’s a unique physical experience of sliding, gliding. It’s exhilarating—the wind that’s blowing, and the wind you create by moving through the air,” she said.

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Education

3 Ways This Surf-Loving Coalition Is Trying to Save Our Oceans

Surfing offers people an almost spiritual connection to the water. #globalgoals

This fall, the United Nations is preparing to launch its 17 Sustainable Development Goals—an extraordinary action plan to solve the world’s biggest problems by 2030. Over the coming months, we’ll be connecting with The Local Globalists: 17 nonprofit founders, entrepreneurs, and social innovators who are working every day, wherever they are, to turn one of the U.N.’s #globalgoals into reality.

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This Entrepreneur Is Turning Period Drama Into an Opportunity for Female Empowerment

Miki Agrawal aims to empower women, one period-proof set of underpants at a time. #globalgoals

This fall, the United Nations is preparing to launch its 17 Sustainable Development Goals—an extraordinary action plan to solve the world’s biggest problems by 2030. Over the coming months, we’ll be connecting with The Local Globalists: 17 nonprofit founders, entrepreneurs, and social innovators who are working every day, wherever they are, to turn one of the U.N.’s #globalgoals into reality.

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How This Rich Kid Plans to End Income Inequality for Everyone

“There is no wealth without genocide and slavery.” #globalgoals

This fall, the United Nations is preparing to launch its 17 Sustainable Development Goals—an extraordinary action plan to solve the world’s biggest problems by 2030. Over the coming months, we’ll be connecting with The Local Globalists: 17 nonprofit founders, entrepreneurs, and social innovators who are working every day, wherever they are, to turn one of the U.N.’s #globalgoals into reality.

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