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Beer Summit

Jim Koch, founder and chairman of The Boston Beer Company, brewers of Samuel Adams Beer, is a pioneer of the American palate as...

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Jaime Wolf on Filmmaker Chris Marker

"May you live in interesting times," that sly curse, reputed to come from ancient China, is actually apocryphal, no more Chinese than the fortune cookies it shows up in; than Robert Kennedy, who quoted it in a 1966 speech at Cape Town University; or than Chris Marker, the elusive French filmmaker who..

"May you live in interesting times," that sly curse, reputed to come from ancient China, is actually apocryphal, no more Chinese than the fortune cookies it shows up in; than Robert Kennedy, who quoted it in a 1966 speech at Cape Town University; or than Chris Marker, the elusive French filmmaker who sometimes claims to have been born in Mongolia. As much as anyone fated to live in these interesting times, however, Marker, who turned 87 this past summer, has succeeded in chronicling, questioning, and illuminating them in extraordinary ways.Marker rose to prominence in the early 1960s alongside brainiac New Wave provocateurs like Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, and Agnès Varda. His films elude easy categorization: Neither fiction nor documentary, they're more like cinematic essays, ranging kaleidoscopically and drolly across politics, anthropology, history, and observations on daily life. Yet they remain yoked to a strong and compelling storyteller's impulse. Refusing personal appearances and foregoing interviews-when asked for a photo, he sends a picture of his cat-Marker has acquired a devoted cult that counts David Bowie, Wim Wenders, and the late Susan Sontag among its members.Before sampling and before blogs, Marker cultivated an aesthetic based on referentiality and visual and literary quotation. But to watch Sans Soleil-a collection of dispatches from Tokyo, Iceland, Guinea-Bissau, and San Francisco-and to learn that Marker also shot in North Korea in 1958, in Cuba following Castro's ascension, and in Soviet Russia, is to feel he has been everywhere and knows everyone. Like Jorge Luis Borges, Marker is encyclopedic yet self-deprecating, projecting the kind of welcoming intelligence that invariably leaves you feeling smarter from the encounter.

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Censor-y Overlords

Under ordinary circumstances, Chinese censors make it difficult for filmmakers to present any kind of meaningful depiction of contemporary life, which is one of the reasons that period stories and martial arts adventures are so prevalent. Like our MPAA ratings board, the State Administration of Radio,..

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7zf9uLKGNAUnder ordinary circumstances, Chinese censors make it difficult for filmmakers to present any kind of meaningful depiction of contemporary life, which is one of the reasons that period stories and martial arts adventures are so prevalent. Like our MPAA ratings board, the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television is generally opaque & high-handed-earlier this year, however, the organization issued a list of specific guidelines that filmmakers are expected to abide by...a list so specific and strict as to shut down nearly all films set in the present, a situation that is expected to last until after the Olympics.Meanwhile, documentaries-made by Chinese and foreigners-remain among the best, and most satisfying means to get beneath the surface of Chinese life. Jung Chang's Up The Yangtze (currently playing in New York, and opening in theaters around the country throughout the summer), about a tour boat cruising the Three Gorges site, deftly counterposes the young members of its crew with the well-off Westerners they serve; clearly China's rapid modernization is no less bewildering to natives than to foreigners. Joana Vasquez-Arong's Neo-Lounge spotlights a high-end bar in Beijing, following the mostly Western expatriates who congregate there over a year in their lives. Manufactured Landscapes, about the photographer Edward Burtynsky, features breathtaking footage of Chinese factories and industry and their environmental impact, while West of the Tracks, a monumental 9-hour film, observes the death of "the iron rice bowl"-heavy industry in the Northeast that had long been the center of the country's economy.And beyond the reach of the government censors, an increasing number of Chinese filmmakers are making underground, un-approved films-both fiction and documentary. Karin Chien, a New York-based indie producer has just launched DGenerate, a distribution apparatus for such titles. This summer, they'll be releasing 15 films focusing on contemporary China, including a feature-length documentary on the nationwide American Idol-esque Super Girl Singing Contest television show and the lyrical San Yuan Li (clip above), a collaborative portrait of a village trapped within rapidly urbanizing Guangzhou, originally commissioned for the 2003 Venice Biennale.

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China's Less-Polished News Sources

Too frequently the slick, overly produced style of network television news shows ends up obscuring the actual subjects they're purportedly...

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Be Scared Of China (Sometimes)

Status of Chinese People is an aggregator blog primarily spotlighting news stories about authoritarian abuses committed by the Chinese Government. One can read through it for useful (if not always or entirely definitive) background on the persecution of Falun Gong, Tibet, censorship, and freedom of speech-we..

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Crazy English

"Crazy English" is a popular method of English-language instruction in which Chinese students declaim random-sounding sentences in unison, in public places at the top of their lungs. Its originator, Li Yang, who has become a very rich man, seems to some more like a demagogue or cult leader than a true..

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